New answers tagged

4

There are very high energetic cosmic rays. The most energetic cosmic rays measured by the Auger observatorium for example have energies in excess of $10^{19}$ eV. They measure a few of those per year. At these energies they are no longer able to identify what type of particle it is, but it is believed to be predominantly protons and iron. These particles are ...


2

The other answers are adequate, answering not a thing to the first part of the question in your title: Would a neutrino bomb do anything? But questions in titles are important, so I will reply to the second part, Or can weak force kill you? : Of course the weak force can be lethal. The simplest example is the decay of neutrons , it is a weak decay , but ...


2

The Earth is much more massive than its human population. If the Earth is transparent to neutrinos from this device, so are the people on it. In supernova explosions the neutrino flux is large enough to have an important effect on fluid transport. (Kip Thorne discusses this in "Black Holes and Time Warps.") Here is an estimate that to receive a lethal dose ...


1

There was also a science fiction story where somebody invented a neutrino bomb. It was claimed that such a bomb would turn all the matter in it to neutrinos, which would escape without damaging anything. The first part doesn't work (think baryon conservation) but the second does. It pointed out that a vacuum would be left, so air would rush in with a ...


2

let's talk about efficiency bounds The flux of solar neutrinos at the earth's surface is on the order of $10^{11}$ per cm²/s. Even the largest detectors detect less than a few hundreds neutrinos by day. 7Be Solar Neutrino Measurement with KamLAND Let's assume the incredible facts that such detector has only 10 cm² area and that all the ...


0

To calculate the decay width, you will need to first compute the scattering amplitudes for all processes contributing to the decay, to your desired order in perturbation theory. To compute the width for a two-body phase space, one has to evaluate the integral, $$\Gamma = \int \frac{d\Omega_{\mathrm{cm}}}{4\pi} \frac{1}{8\pi} \left( ...


2

It depends on various things: the energy $E$ of each neutrino, how likely each of them is to interact with a particle in your body (expressed as a cross-section $\sigma$, which depends on $E$), and how large an acceleration $a$ you consider "significant". Further let $m$ be your mass, $75\;\rm kg$. I've pilfered some rough numbers from here, namely ...


3

If we indeed suppose that such an exotic material did indeed exist, then we just have to consider the flux of solar neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. This is about $10^{11} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ at about 0.4 Mev each. So a one-metre square sheet of annixxite, would generate, in Watts: $$ {1\over2} \times 10^{11} \times 10^4 \times (0.4 \times 10^6) \times ...


1

I think you use "relative vs absolute" to mean "distinguishable vs undetermined". If this is the case, we could say it is a possibility that yes, the charge of neutrino is undetermined (relative). This is because having a charge, is physics jargon for "susceptible of certain kind of interaction". Thus neutrinos have no electric charge (do not "feel" ...


0

It really depends on what you mean exactly by "charge." A neutrino has no electric charge, so we'll never find an electrically charged particle that interacts electrically with it. On the other hand, neutrinos (and other particles) have other intrinsic properties that really only differ from charge in their function. For example, neutrinos have mass, so ...


3

The core reaction would be $$ n + \nu \longrightarrow p + e^- \,,$$ which respects all the necessary conservation laws (it's diagram is, after all, a rotation of the usual beta decay diagram). I am not aware of a measurement of this particular process, but $$ {}^{37}\mathrm{Cl} + \nu \longrightarrow {}^{37}\mathrm{Ar} + e^- $$ (which obviously has the same ...


0

All theories are actually models we use trying to describe what we can see and measure. These models are not the Universe itself, we are just trying to find the model that fits best. As physics evolves, we create better models. These usually expand/modify the 'previous one'. In this meaning SR is the foundation of GR, but Newtonian physics is also foundation ...



Top 50 recent answers are included