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2

First, let's clear up some terminology: the usual statement "Majorana fermions are their own antiparticles" is correct, but confusing because the words we usually use to describe neutrinos are made for Dirac fermions. If neutrinos had no mass at all, there would be two independent types of neutrino: a left-handed and a right-handed neutrino. These particles ...


0

All particles, even massless ones, are affected by gravity - it is just a question of degree. The (kinetic) energy of the neutrinos produced in a supernova are of the order of 10 MeV. If the neutrinos have a rest mass energy of say an eV (though it might be much less than this), then their gravitational potential energy were they situated on the surface of ...


-1

I'm a layman also, but can answer your first question by saying that the general theory and definition of gravity involves anything with mass. Because neutrinos are particles and have mass then yes, they are affected by gravity. Photons are subatomic particles also. Since we can see that photons bend their stream while passing planets and other large ...


5

In short, it is extremely challenging if not impossible to detect SNe Ia before we see them. As you said, the neutrino signal would be even weaker than for core-collapse events, and even that is pretty weak. We only caught one or two dozen neutrinos from SN 1987A, and that essentially went off in our own galaxy. No other particles would escape faster than ...



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