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3

Half. The escape velocity for an object at a distance $D$ from an object of mass $M$ is $\sqrt{2GM/D}$. The circular orbital velocity (the Moon is on an orbit that's close enough to circular that I'll just assume this) at the same distance is $\sqrt{GM/D}$. Setting the escape velocity from the Earth with it's new reduced mass $M_{\rm new}$ equal to the ...


1

Assuming that we are making a certain amount of the earth's mass disappear instantly somehow, doing this will decrease the escape velocity of the earth. The moon is already moving at its orbital velocity in an orbit centered on the current center of mass of the earth-moon system. If we took away so much mass (instantaneously, somehow) that the escape ...


3

Based on my own anecdotal evidence, it doesn't. Several years ago there was a partial solar eclipse in my area. I don't remember precisely how much of the sun's disk was covered - it wasn't much, surely nowhere near 90% - but I do remember getting out of the house in the morning, thinking "hmm, it's quite dark today", then having the eerie realization that ...


79

Human perception is generally logarithmic. For example, the perceived loudness of a sound is measured using decibels, where an decrease of $10 \text{ dB}$ divides the sound intensity by $10$. So if the eclipse were heard instead of seen, "90% coverage" might mean reducing the intensity from $120 \text{ dB}$ to $110 \text{ dB}$, a small change. Perceived ...


42

The graph looks exponential because the vertical axis is logarithmic! If you were to re-plot it as linear lumens per square meter, it would be much more v-like, or even u-like. It so happens that a logarithmic plot matches our subjective perception of light intensity better than a linear one would. That's a result of our eyes having evolved to work well in ...


2

First, notice that this happens on earth too, the tidal effect of the moon is about 2.3 times larger than that of the sun. The fact that both orbits go in opposite directions will not be qualitatively important, only quantitatively in terms of the irregular variation in tidal periods and sizes. If the two moons have the same density and angular size in ...


-1

The simplest answer is that the Earth is even MORE massive. Don't let Earth's lack of stature relative to the Jovian systems fool you. The gas giants are truly massive but are not nor do they have physical land and water at their surface. This may seem laughable on its face as what could be more massive than a gaseous body in a liquid state? Nay, veerily....


0

You are wrong, the orbit of the moon is changing, it is receding from the earth so its potential and kinetic energy is changing : The notional tidal bulges are carried ahead of the Earth–Moon axis by the continents as a result of Earth's rotation. The eccentric mass of each bulge exerts a small amount of gravitational attraction on the Moon, with the ...



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