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You miss the main factor: Moon/Sun are the triggers, but tidal wave is at first the mechanical response of the water body constrained by the topography of the floor and coasts. That's why some regions in the world can have huge tides, and some others have 1 or 3 high tide a day instead of 2. Sort of vibrating modes. I don't see how evaporation and rain ...


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Why are Lunar Eclipse more common than Solar Eclipse? They aren't. Lunar eclipses and solar eclipses occur with almost equal frequency. From http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html and pages within, there were / will be 11898 solar eclipses of all types and 12064 lunar eclipses of all types in the five millennia between 2000 BCE to 3000 CE. Lunar ...


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The apparent size of the moon (from Earth) is about the same as the sun's. Therefore the moon has to pass over the sun's path at the time of the new moon for there to be a solar eclipse. The apparent size of Earth (from the moon) is much greater than that of the sun - because the Earth's diameter is about 4 times that of the moon, and hence the alignment ...


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Like tides on the ocean, it is a consequence of the tidal forces (if the claim is correct at all which I am verifying now). Tidal forces result from inhomogeneities of the gravitational acceleration. If we approximated the external gravitational acceleration $\vec g$ caused by the Moon or the Sun to be constant all over the Earth and its vicinity, the Earth ...


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First, when calculating force, the unit produced is newtons (N), not kg. You can use kg(force) if you're willing to risk getting confused, and your calculation of the falcon weight shows that you did get confused. In a 1g environment, 1 kg of mass produces 1 kg of force, so there is no multiplication by 9.8. The gravitational attraction between any two ...


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Let's simplify the scenario slightly - imagine an object at the distance of the Moon, that has had its angular momentum slowed sufficiently that it will approach the Earth to a distance less than the radius of the Earth plus the radius of the Moon. Distance Moon-Earth ~ 400,000 km Radius Moon ~ 1,700 km Radius Earth ~ 6,300 km Mass Moon ...


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If the mass of the moon is $$ M=7\cdot 10^{22}\text{ kg} $$ and its orbital velocity is $$ \Delta v = 1000 \text{ m/s}$$ while the time in which you need your job done is $$ t = 1\text{ yr}=365.25\cdot 24 \cdot 60 \cdot 60 \text{ s}$$ then the force you need is in Newton $$F = \frac{M\cdot v}{t} = 2.2\cdot 10^{18} \text{ N}$$ or a power in Watt of ...



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