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As explained in this article by Neill DeGrasse Tyson, the tidal forces between the Earth and the moon do indeed slow down the rotation of the Earth each year, the same process that caused the moon's rotation to become tidally locked with its orbit of the Earth. This effect would eventually cause the Earth's rotation to be tidally locked with the moon as ...


2

The common mass center of Earth-Moon couple is about 4600km away from Earth's center. Earth's orbit around the sun is not a perfect ellipse. Earth is also moving around the earth-moon couple's center of mass like moon. Imagine an ellipse superposed with a little wave. Vs: Earth's linear speed around sun (about 30 km/s) Vm: Earth's linear speed around the ...


1

The answer is the same as the answer to the question "why do satellites stay in orbit": the gravitational pull of the earth is just strong enough to keep it in orbit at the altitude it is, given the angular momentum (velocity) that it has. In equations: $$\frac{GM_{earth}}{r^2}=\frac{v^2}{r}$$ where $r$ is the distance from the center of the earth to the ...


0

It's moving the orbital velocity for its particular altitude, which means it has the exactly the speed at which Earth's gravity supplies the centripetal force needed to accelerate it in a circle. Now, I'm guessing what you mean by your question is that at the surface of the Earth, we need to boost a rocket to about $v_e(R_\oplus)=11{\rm km s^{-1}}$ (let ...


5

First off, we should take the wisdom of Jack Wisdom to heart: "Calculation of the history of the lunar orbit is fraught with difficulties." While calculating the history may well be fraught with difficulties, calculating the future is hugely problematic. For the sake of argument, I'll ignore that issue. The OP suggests the end of the planet is about 5 ...



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