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yes it would, because of the moons atmosphere, even the craters have not faded away so the footsteps would not fade away. Best type of legacy one can leave


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The space appearing black despite the abundance of stars is Olbers' paradox. Poet Edgar Allan Poe suggested that the finite size of the observable universe resolves the apparent paradox: because the universe is finitely old and the speed of light is finite, only finitely many stars can be observed within a given volume of space visible from ...


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The reason the sky is blue on Earth is because of the Earth's atmosphere. The molecules and gas in the atmosphere interact with solar light via Rayleigh scattering, which allows for blue light to be scattered more efficiently than lower frequencies. This results in an abundance of blue light, which makes the sky look blue. Actually it should be said that ...


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They say that gravity decreases as we dig into the earth. That's an immediate consequence of an overly simplistic model of the Earth, that the Earth is of a uniform density throughout. This is very far from the case. But I also read that gravity increases for the first approx. 2000km of distance underground Actually, it's about 2900 km ...


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The local gravitational field increases (slightly) as you descend under the earth because much of the earths mass is in the core, and you're getting closer to the core. As the moon has a smaller core, this effect would be reduced. Even on earth, the effect is not really noticeable at depths we can dig to. So the effect may not be present on the moon, ...


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Lunar soil or lunar regolith, is mostly created by meteorite and micrometeorite impacts which directly pulverize the rock, or from the ejecta from the impact. Some amount (I can't seem to find any figures) is also created from high-energy particles in solar wind causing bits of rock to spall. In theory, the bootprints would last until the soil turns over ...


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Gray is not a color - it is a shade. A shade of white. We perceive something as gray when it has no obvious "color" (that is, the amount of red, green, blue stimulus that the cones in our retina receive are roughly the same), and Something else in our field of view is brighter Our eyes adjust our perception of gray or white relative to "something else". ...


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The moon appears white from the Earth for two reasons. The first is that the reflected spectrum of sunlight is very broad and contains no very significant features. On this basis, the spectrum of the moon could be considered pinkish, as the reflectance of sunlight (which appears almost white to the human eye) is twice as effective at red wavelengths than ...


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It is not white, see this link for photos: http://www.mikeoates.org/mas/projects/mooncolour/intro.htm See also this image I took, it does not appear white, one of the seas looks blue. See this photo with increased saturation. It appears that on average the Moon is grey with light coloration aligned with the terrain ranging from yellow to blue. The ...


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The moon is actually grey. You can see this if you look at images taken in space, or, preferably, on the moon itself. For example, this one, of Buzz Aldrin: (Courtesy of NASA) But, seeing as how at night you compare it to a black sky, it appears white.


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For emphasis: The Moon is grey, but it looks white because of scattering along with sunlight. The dark parts - which are less common - are maria, plains of volcanic rock (basalt). They are relatively old, as there has been no recent volcanic activity on the Moon. Most are on the near side of the Moon. By contrast, the white parts are often referred to as ...



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