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To formalize @GrahamReid's comments, Tides get their energy from the tidal forces exerted on the Earth by the Moon. Since the moon orbits around the earth much slower than the earth rotates, the moon drags water and rock around the earth in the direction opposite its rotation. In this manner angular momentum and energy is transferred from the rotation of ...


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Any shadow, either that of a small ball or a celestial body(especially spherical) consists of two parts umbra and penumbra. They are separated by a distinct border. Think of the moon(object) casting its shadow on the earth(screen) due to the sun(light source). Due to relative distances the moon's umbra is small, so only a small portion is in extreme darkness....


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The only difference is a minute change in brightness as the earth-sun distance changes from 147000 km (perihelion) to 152000 km (aphelion). Thus, at perihelion the sunlight is slightly more intense, and hence, so is the moonlight. At aphelion it's a little less intense, and at equinox it is about midway between those two. This difference is far smaller than ...


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The diagram you drew is flat, but the solar system is not. The Moon's orbit is not in the same plane as the Earth's orbit. Wikipedia has a nice diagram: Because of this, when the Moon is "in between" the Earth and the Sun, it is usually a little "above" or "below" the Sun as well. You can observe this for yourself: one or two days after the new moon, ...


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While excellent answers have already been provided (yes, it's Earthshine; yes, when the Moon is between the Sun and the Earth, you don't see the Moon at night, you see it from the daylit side of the Earth) given all the "artist's renderings" in the question and the answers, I thought it might be useful to include a diagram that demonstrates the actual scale ...


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The premise of this question is wrong. If the moon is in between the earth and the sun (as shown on your diagram), and you can see the moon, then it is day, not night: If on the other hand, you are on the opposite side of the earth during that configuration (so that it is night), then you can't see the moon because the earth is blocking your view of it:


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The moon circles around the earth, so half the time it is between the earth and the sun and half the time the earth is between the sun and the moon. Therefore also the moon rises and sets, the same way the sun rises and sets. If it's midnight (your are on the opposite site of the earth than the sun) and the moon is betweem the sun and the earth you can't ...


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The sun doesn't just illuminate the moon directly. The moon is also illuminated by sunlight reflected from the earth. This is called earthshine. This makes the parts of the moon that face us visible even when the sun is on the other side. According to NASA, it was Leonardo da Vinci who first explained this. As an example, the brightly lit portion of ...


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If it is really between the earth and the sun it is called a "solar eclipse" and and the moon's shadow falls on the earth at certain places, because it is not large enough to cover the whole sun except on a shadow path. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon completely covers the Sun's disk, as seen in this 1999 solar eclipse. Solar prominences can ...



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