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This answer I once gave for What does it mean for two objects to "touch"? discusses what touching even means. It's not a direct answer to your question, but I think it may help you view the issue in a different way. Warning: It's one of my long, talky answers that some people love and others hate. The physics in it is accurate (and for many folks, ...


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This very much depends on how you define the measurement. The simplest answer would be that the distance is zero since they are touching, but I assume you are making reference to the electromagnetic forces/Pauli exclusion principle that keep the electron clouds of the molecules and atoms from actually intersecting. However, since the electrons are in clouds ...


1

A sharp knife is still several molecules thick on the edge; dull blades are even wider. So when you attempt to cut material, it needs to be ripped apart. As explained in other answers, the material either fractures along faults in the lattice, or you separate molecules (as when you cut bread). The only materials where you might split chemical bonds are ...


0

I think you have a basic problem in understanding what energy and heat and vibration are, and how they are connected, looking at your comments. Assume there is nothing like heat. In that case, you won't have the doubt of how is heat transferred to vibration. Assume there only exists kinetic energy. Now, when we heat, essentially we are bring in contact with ...


0

Both isotopes are isovalent so electronically they are identical (in essence your not going to get that much difference in bond angle). However in the asymmetric well approximation since deuterium is heavier the $D-O$ bond is lowered down the well i.e. it has a lower ZPE than the $H-O$ bond and is therefore a stronger bond. This means it has a smaller ...


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According to http://www1.lsbu.ac.uk/water/data.html (and with reference to A. G. Császár, G. Czakó, T. Furtenbacher, J. Tennyson, V. Szalay, S. V. Shirin, N. F. Zobov and O. L. Polyansky, On equilibrium structures of the water molecule, J. Chem. Phys. 122 (2005) 214305), the bond angles H-O-H and D-O-D are pretty much the same - 104.50 and 104.49 deg., ...


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It seems that most places I've read (on the web) people refer to the depressurization of water (in a vacuum or space) as "boiling" but I have very rarely seen this referred to as an out-gassing of the water's internal dissolved gases (nitrogen, oxygen, CO2, or any other gases that may be used in a space vehicle). However, unlike traditional boiling which ...


3

The continuum states are different in several aspects. First, there are a countably infinite number of bound molecular states vs an uncountably infinite number of states in any finite range of the continuum. Thus, the ratio of total number of bound states over the number of states in even a small range at the beginning of the continuum is effectively ...



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