Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

In the book "Physics of the Plasma Universe" Dr. Anthony Peratt puts candle flames near the bottom of "energy in electronvolts" portion of the 'plasma spectrum'. If you look at the chart below, you'll see candles flames about midway (ok, cosmologically) between the ends: solar bodies and laser radiation terrestrial flames interstellar charged gases ...


6

The red, orange, yellow, and white parts of a candle flame results from glowing soot. The color in this part of the flame is indicative of the temperature. The spectrum in this part of the flame is fairly close to that of a black body. The blue part of the candle flame at the bottom of the flame results from chemiluminescence. Chemiluminescence is not black ...


1

The answer is that the term symbol refers to the entire, multielectronic, molecule. You are indeed correct that a single electron in a $\Sigma$ state must be symmetric under reflection about a plane that contains the internuclear axis. If you have multiple electrons, however, you can still have a global antisymmetry under such reflections, and get their ...


3

This is a very good question. First of all, you are absolutely correct that, for a single electron, invariance under $\phi\to-\phi$ means invariance under $y\to-y$. This is obvious just from looking at the coordinates $x=\rho\cos(\phi)$ and $y=\rho\sin(\phi)$. It is clear that $\phi\to-\phi$ means the exact same thing as $y\to-y$. The answer is a little ...


0

Maybe I am missing the point, but if the article says that the wave functions are "either symmetric or antisymmetric" about this axis, then for the Z=0 case they are (only ever) symmetric which is indeed one of the allowed cases. "Either... or" doesn't mean "it has to be capable of both", but "it can only be one of these".



Top 50 recent answers are included