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6

Yes. Ordinary quantum field theory is as wrong as Newtonian gravity for not including GR effects. That is to say, it is a perfectly fine theory inside its domain of validity, which in this case means pretty much everything below the Planck scale, just as Newtonian mechanics is valid for speed much less than the relativistic scale (the speed of light). ...


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This actually extends beyond just computational approaches and applies to experimental approaches also. And it's not at all a trivial problem to address. Generally speaking, we construct a model of some physical system -- either computationally or experimentally -- and we make certain assumptions to simplify the problem. In your circuit example, maybe we ...


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The model is good as a probability model for quantum mechanics, up to the "superposition", where you say: Nobody knows where is the red and the black card, so each card is red or black with the 50% of probability. In other words each card is red and black at the same time (superposition). No , just the state of the card is unknown, it is not half ...


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A "theory" is nothing more than a recipe to describe a natural phenomenon. There can be many theories to describe the same thing, just as I can use different words to describe the same object. Theories can be very different from one another for several reasons. They can describe the same exact phenomenology with different formalism (different words for the ...


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in short, it is a fitting issue ... Many theories may solve a hierarchical classes of problems. ex for gravitation : newtonian mechanics ( NM ) and GR. Both work well always otherwise in critical cases where GR is necessary. All what NM does is well handled by GR but not the reverse. On another hand, GR is more complex than NM. When one has the choice ...



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