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In the place where it was calibrated. I'm pretty sure scales are not calibrated to fit the international standard gravity. The lab that put a standard weight on it and set it to show the desired result had the conditions ($g$, air density [related to temperature and pressure], and other less influential parameters) that are required to reproduce the ...


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Short answer: wherever it is calibrated to be so. Full answer: The kilogram is a unit of mass. Weight is the force of gravity on a particular mass. It is convenient to use "kilogram" rather than "Newtons" when you are more interested in the quantity of "stuff" than the force of that stuff - and use the Newton when the force matters. For example - an ...


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EDIT: Though most of the comments have now been deleted, I state the following for completeness: The kg is a unit of mass. Weight is a force, and like other forces it is measured (in the SI system) in Newtons. The weight of a body is given by the equation f=ma, where a is acceleration (in this case the local acceleration due to gravity.) Therefore we can ...


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In addition to the good answers already given a couple of points. 1) if you used scales where one mass balances another mass like this one Then you would not have problems with any variation in $g$. 2) I did a google search to check what people use to measure the mass of gold (and also diamond) and everything came back as digital scales like the one ...


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The answer to the question is both yes and no. Yes, the scales will display 1kg when calibrated in the same gravity zone. Otherwise, no it won´t. The force of gravity varies simply because of the shape of the earth, and its rotation (speed). On both poles the speed is next to nothing, yet in "Middle Earth" velocity is at its highest. So, the actual shape ...


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These digital scales basically measure the force $F$ required to counteract the weight force when used properly. From a measurement of the force, the scale then converts this to a mass measurement using some conversion akin to $m=F/g$. On different places on Earth, you'll get different "mass" measurements since these devices use a single value for $g$. The ...


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If the scale is correctly calibrated, it will measure 1kg everywhere the variation of weight is lower than the resolution of the scale. For example, París. Of course, this neglects atmospheric pressure and temperature variations.


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The speed of light can't be measured anymore (in SI units) because it has had a defined value since 1983. See Why do universal constants have the values they do? Before 1983, the meter was defined in terms of the wavelength of a certain emission line of krypton 86. The second is also defined in terms of an atomic standard (the frequency of a transition in ...


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The two most common conventions I know are Report the standard deviation of the result: this tells you that a further measurement has 68% probability of falling inside the interval Report the standard error of the measurement (standard deviation / $\sqrt{n}$). This tell you there is a 68% chance that the actual value (the mean of the underlying population) ...


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Sometimes a picture tells a thousand words... It all depends what question you ask Wolfram Alpha: Floating point arithmetic leads to rounding errors. Non SI units are rarely defined precisely (an exception is the inch which is exactly 25.4 mm - and thus other derived units of length). But getting back to the "what is the value" - we should go with ...


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1 PSI is 0.0689475728 bar which means that 1 bar is 14.50377397 PSI. Thus, $$ \frac{6894.7573\,{\rm bar}}{1}\times\frac{14.50377397 \,\rm PSI}{1\,\rm bar}=100000.0002900755\,\rm PSI $$ which is slightly off from both sources. NIST says that 1 Bar = $10^5$ Pascal 1 PSI = $6.894757\times10^3$ Pascal Thus, $$ 6.894757\times10^{-2}\,{\rm ...



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