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As mentioned by WhatRoughBeast, caesium offers several advantage over other microwave standards. Its most important feature is the presence of an atomic transition with a very small linewidth. This allows the energy of this transition to be established very accurately (see the uncertainty principle). However, caesium is not the only atom with a narrow ...


-1

As other users have said, it has one stable isotope, so that's nice. It's also the SI standard. We define the second by Caesium. Specifically: The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the cesium 133 atom. So, if we were to use another ...


20

The choice of cesium is due to various factors. It's worth noting that your statement "Modern atomic clocks only use caesium atoms" is simply untrue. At the very least, rubidium and hydrogen clocks are common, and you can get rubidium standards on eBay for well under $200. But the best performance comes from using cesium. In part this is because it was ...


72

"Because that is how the second is defined" is nice - but that immediately leads us to the question "why did Cesium become the standard"? To answer that we have to look at the principle of an atomic clock: you look at the frequency of the hyperfine transition - a splitting of energy levels caused by the magnetic field of the nucleus. For this to work you ...


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Because one second is defined as (from the SI brochure): the duration of 9192631770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom, ${}^{133}\mathrm{Cs}$. Thus, using any other atom is irrelevant (even if calculate some correction time factor).



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