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The first is, is my understanding described above correct? Basically, yes. The second is, how does this affect us healthwise? We are stuck with these debris of cesium-137 and strontium-90 for the next 30 or more years, but what effect do they have on us? Stochastic health effects (induced tumors, cancers, leukemia,…) of ionizing radiation are ...


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See if this argument works - I am making this up on the spot so there is definitely space for argument... Most of the interactions with the electrons will not be "head-on collisions" but rather electrostatic interactions. If we get to a certain distance of an electron, it will feel the force and undergo acceleration. If the time of the interaction is short, ...


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Here is what wiki has to say about Polonium radiological toxicity: By mass, polonium-210 is around 250,000 times more toxic than hydrogen cyanide (the LD50 for 210Po is less than 1 microgram for an average adult (see below) compared with about 250 milligrams for hydrogen cyanide[66]). The main hazard is its intense radioactivity (as an alpha ...


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Let's suppose you have swallowed one of the Po-210 sources from this student kit. Its activity is 3700 Bq (0.1 μCi). Based on the Table 6 in the meta-study [1], it is probably safe to ingest up to 0.02 MBq/kg of the Po-210. This means, that for 80 kg person, it is probably safe to ingest 1.6 MBq of the Po-210, so you "need" to eat approx. 400 of these ...


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Let me start off with something that should be obvious but I feel the huge need to say it -- I am not trained in the biomedical field and what I put in my answer should not be construed as definitive and ready-for-use in actual patients. I will do my best and present what I think is correct, but I am not a doctor and don't even pretend to play one on TV. ...


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It's a conventions issue. When you define a system (a cell, a car tire, an atom), there is the system, and its surroundings. If you're interested in describing the system, you will discuss the properties of the system relative to the surroundings. Saying any given description of the system is positive is saying that the system has higher pressure / greater ...


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Sound waves are pressure waves. We measure it as a logarithmic ratio of intensity. Sound intensity is a useful parameter to measure because it's related to the energy incident on a surface which can be easy to measure. Sound intensity is proportional to pressure squared. When calculating decibels we would have to handle that like so: \begin{equation} I = ...



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