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The electron does not move - it has no well-defined position in the orbital state, and hence no well-defined momentum. Neither does it "teleport" around - as long as it is not interacting with something that forces it to be at a definite position, its state is "smeared" all over the electron as an electron cloud. Yes, this is essentially the Bohr model, ...


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I will answer this part In addition, we know that the Hamiltonian represents the sum of kinetic and potential energy in a system.However, I'm not quite sure why, intuitively, the time dependent version of the Schrodinger equation becomes Hψ=iℏ ∂/∂t ψ(r,t). Quantum mechanics was developed slowly, because experiments showed that light came in quanta ...


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You ask a couple of different questions: 1) You say "by Heisenberg's uncertainty, we cannot measure the exact momentum or position of a particle/wave ever". No, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle doesn't say that. It says that IF you measure the position of a QUANTUM particle with precision Δx, i.e. you localize the particle within an interval Δx, then the ...


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There are many confuse things in this question: 1) "The multiple paths the particle simultaneously travels, interfere with each other" It's not the paths that interfere, when these paths cross one another, i.e. the wave-packet on one path and the wave-packet on the other path pass through the same region at the SAME TIME. 2) "but as it is absorbed, it ...


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Given that Bohmian mechanics (better named de Broglie-Bohm or dBB theory) contains the Schrödinger equation, it contains quantum theory completely, and therefore all things which make sense in quantum theory remain meaningful. Of course, for quasiparticles nobody plans to construct trajectories. And it is also not possible to simply "watch" Bohmian ...


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Mathematics is a very powerful discipline. One can have a very large number of theories, starting from algebra, going to topological theories, and they are based on an internal very strict self consistency. They start by axioms, develop functional dependences and the whole mathematical construct is self contained . That is why one has proofs in mathematical ...


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You're asking what could be a very deep question. But let me take a not-so-deep approach to answering that gets at the nature of science. It is experimental fact that we only measure particular values of quantities at the quantum level. That's it. Nature doesn't care about eigenvalues or operators; only humans do. That being said, physicists have, based on ...


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I read what is written in the physicsforums.com/threads/ that you indicate. So, you speak of the electron as of a QUANTUM particle. That means that it has a linear momentum of the same order of magnitude as that of the particles with which you want to test its movement. If the linear momentum of those particles were much smaller, s.t. the collision with ...


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If your electron is very fast you can track its trajectory in a ionization chamber. But if the electron is slow, its wave-like (quantum) character enters into the scene. About absorption and re-emission of a photon, please check if such things are possible, i.e. write the laws of conservation of energy and momentum as if these two bodies are billiard balls, ...


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In a given volume, we can have light throughout, such that there is no space with no light in it (with the electron which is to be seen). Note that in this view you can hardly talk of photons as particles localized somewhere and somehow bouncing around. If you consider a given volume with a given amount of electromagnetic radiation in it you are ...


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I must contradict anna v and acouriousmind. Firstly, I agree: The physical everyday work is determined by experiments and calculation and not by interpretation. But we sent out physicists to come back with results. Certainly they shall calculate, apply rigor, but do not forget the reason why you are working! The KISS-(keep-it-simple-stupid)-argumentation ...


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[Disclaimer: this is a personal view. It is not necessarily reflective of what physicists at large think, nor is it accepted canon] Interpretations are what happens when people forget what science is all about. With all that we know, with all that we have found out to predict the world, we tend to assign reality to concepts like operators or wavefunctions. ...


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We do experiments and come up with distributions of the variables that can be measured. There exists a very deterministic theory, Quantum Mechanics, that predicts accurately probability distributions for our measurements and the theory is continuously validated. Probabilities exist in the classical physics regime and mean exactly the same thing as the ...


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The collapse is a non-unitary operation. It cannot be reversed (undone). Typically, we establish contact between the studied system and a macroscopic body (apparatus) that we are unable to describe by a wave-function. Also, we are not able to describe rigorously the process that follows this contact. The projection transformation done by such an apparatus on ...


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The notion of wave-particle duality and the abstract mathematical solution to particle location probability is widely misunderstood,and often incorrectly associated even by practising nuclear physicists. Experimentation shows that there is indeed incidences where atomic particles behave like waves and sometimes like particles such as in the primary dual ...


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The whole artillery of Quantum Mechanics, operators and all, is a mathematical description of the result of measurements. The contact of the mathematics with measurements comes from the postulates: 1) To every observable there corresponds an operator 2) The square of the wave function for the specific system gives the probability of finding the system ...


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Perhaps I misunderstand your question but I would like to make clear that operating on a state with say, the momentum operator is not meant to be the equivalent of measuring the momentum of the system in that state. Consider, for example, a state that is a superposition of two momentum eigenstates: $$|\psi\rangle = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\left(\,|p_1\rangle + ...


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Here are two examples where these things are measured in practice. Energy In photoelectron spectroscopy, electrons are knocked out of atoms or molecules by ultraviolet radiation - photons with 10 or more eV of energy. The energy of the electrons emitted $E_e$ is given by $E_e = h\nu - \text{binding energy of electron}$, where $h\nu$ is the energy of the ...



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