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Messiah's assertion is based simply on the fact that the diaphragm is a physical object. If you accept that all physical objects follow quantum mechanics, then it follows that the diaphragm is also a quantum object. Of course, if you postulate that all physical objects follow quantum mechanics, then a number of other problems appear, like the fact that we ...


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First of all, it is indeed correct to model decoherence the system has to interact with what is called the "environment". Basically you have a joint CLOSED (unitary) evolution of system+environment, after which you discard the environment (technically called a partial trace), and you are left with the state of the system. Your "observer" can be taken as part ...


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If your electron is in a pure state then it's an eigenfunction, $\psi_e$, of the Hamiltonian describing it, $H_e$. The measuring system will also, in principle at least, be described by some wavefunction, $\psi_m$. If the two don't interact then the total wavefunction will just be a product: $$ \Psi = \psi_e\psi_m $$ and the system won't change with time. ...


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When you measure the position of an electron that is in a pure energy state, what happens the energy becomes non-deterministic. An electron in a pure energy state is in a bound state. To "measure it" you have to excite it or , if it is in an already excited state measure the photon of its deexcitation. You cannot measure its position, while bound, to ...


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Some thoughts about Breuer (1995). Not really an answer, but too long to be a comment. Breuer concludes that ... (1) no theory can predict the future of the system where the observer is properly included. Breuer proves ... that (2) the observer cannot distinguish all phase space states of a system where he is contained. How can one conclude (1) ...


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If you're looking for a general solution to the schrodinger equation then yes, it is possible for the atom to be in a superposition of energy states. This does not violate conservation of energy. Can you see why? It is a subtle point. To start you off -- how do you measure the position of the electron in the first place? You must hit it with something. This ...



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