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A study undertaken by Nutting and Nuttall at the University of Leeds found that "gold is not inherently more ductile than other face-centered cubic metals", such as copper. The authors found by experimentation that "gold is considerably less ductile in tension than silver." But when beaten foil becomes very thin, other metals tend to fragment, whereas gold ...


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Having previously done academic research on various aspects of knives, I agree with @MSAlters - the actual polymer you're cutting is quite tough. The practical solution is to do what professional knife-users, like butchers, carpet layers, whatever, do: run the blade through a hand-held sharpener after every few strokes. I now do this when indulging ...


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The speed of light in a medium depends on the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation $$v(\nu) = \frac{c}{n(\nu)}$$ where $n(\nu)$ is the refractive index. In a general case, $n(\nu)$ is a complex number, and its imaginary part accounts for the absorption of the medium (i.e. if a material is not transparent at frequency $\nu$, then $\textrm{Im } n(\nu) ...


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Resistance changes with temperature The temperature coefficient of resistance, or TCR, is one of the main used parameters to characterize a resistor. The TCR defines the change in resistance as a function of the ambient temperature. The common way to express the TCR is in ppm/°C, which stands for parts per million per centigrade degree. The temperature ...


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It differs depending on how you formulate it. However, based on your experiments, "Body load" is more descriptive and realistic. Essentially you may want to add a diagonal body load (i.e. $xx,yy$ and $zz$).


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Can you define "side"? Are you looking for a material which changes its absorptivity in one axis only when illuminated from a different axis? I tend to doubt that even hyperboic, aka metamaterials, can demonstrate such a behavior. As you may know, there a variety of organic dyes which are used as either saturable absorbers or saturable transmitters. ...


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Dead simple! Materials tear when the stress in them gets above a certain level. The stress at the tip of even a small but sharp crack is huge! So it doesn't take much extra force to cause the small crack to tear through the material. How do you tear a sheet of paper? Put a small crack in it then pull! However, I have to expand on this to clear ...



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