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After some research, I've found this spiel about elastic collisions:


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Here is a bit of basic physics. If you drop a mass $m$ with area $A$ from a height $h$ onto snow, and it penetrates the snow to a depth $d$, then the average pressure on the snow during the fall is calculated as follows: Total distance dropped: $D = h+d$. Total gravitational energy: $E = mg(h+d)$ Retarding force $F$ acted over distance $d$ to do the ...


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To understand the matter-energy conversion you need to understand how quantum field theory describes matter. Quantum field theory postulates that for every type of particle there is a corresponding quantum field that fills all of spacetime. Particles are described as excitations of these fields. If you add a quantum of energy to a field the energy appears ...


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Usually the energetic process results in a very localized and extremely high energy density; e.g., a group of electrons are ejected from a target by means of a very short, intense laser pulse; some of the electrons will return due to the strong electrical attraction of their negative charges with the equally positive target; when the returning electrons ...


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Whenever you have mass you have energy too, lots of energy for a tiny bit of mass. And it is energy not mass, that is related to spacetime curvature. Your idea that mass curves spacetime and energy does not, is a lie, completely 100% baseless and simply untrue. It's just that the energy associated with mass is the largest energy you are used to seeing ...


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The question you ask is very similar to the question that you already answered! I'll go ahead and step you through it. Before we do anything, we should see if the ice even gets to $0^\circ \text{ C}$! If it doesn't, then none of it will melt. To do so, let's examine how much kinetic energy can be converted to heat: $$Q = \frac{1}{2}m\Delta(v^2) = ...


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According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, both matter and energy curve spacetime. The theory already makes an allowance for matter-energy equivalence. The Einstein field equations are: $$G_{\mu\nu} + \Lambda g_{\mu\nu} = k T_{\mu\nu}$$ The left hand side has the Einstein tensor G which encapsulates the curvature of spacetime, and the right side ...



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