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You can introduce the ``would-be'' bosonic mean field exactly, using the Hubbard-Stratonich (a.k.a partial bosonization) method, see wikipedia and Interacting fermions on a lattice and Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and mean-field approximation . The mean field approximation correspond to performing the integral over the bosonic field using the ...


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Mean-field theory is exact (in the thermodynamic limit) in the case of long-range interaction (which is not the case for the nearest-neighbor Ising model). Therefore, mean-field theory is exact for BCS, where you have an effective long-range interaction. As for rigorous results, Bogoliubov rigorously proved that in the ground state (zero temperature) the ...


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Mean field theory is only good when fluctuations are small, which means that the free energy of a fluctuation must be much smaller than the total free energy. The free energy of the typical fluctuation is of order $kT$ and its size is determined by the correlation length $\xi$, and is of order $\xi^d$, with $d=$ dimension: $$F_{fluct}\sim ...


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Probably the best place to start classically is with integrable systems. A crude physicist definition is that these are systems that have, in the words of Nandkishore et al, "an infinite set of extensive conserved quantities that are sums of local operators" (1). Roughly speaking, such systems will never approach an equilibrium because none of these ...



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