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Could the phenomenon of vortex bursting be exploited to reduce wake turbulence? Well, it's the only way to get rid of the Turbelence. Turbulence is caused by vortexes and they obviously must burst, before they completely stop. My question is, what are the physical variables which promote or inhibit vortex bursting and, if they can be controlled, can this ...


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The article defines lift as a force vector perpendicular to the aircraft's path through the air, not the force vector needed to balance gravity. Similarly, thrust is considered a force vector parallel to aircraft's path. If you imagine an aircraft pitching up from level to vertical (and its flight path inclining accordingly), as its pitch increases, the lift ...


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In a nutshell, if we assume all gases are similar - which they're in the ballpark, Helium has an atomic weight of 4, Nitrogen-2, an atomic weight of 28 and Oxygen 32. So Helium is roughly 1/7th the density of air. The cool thing is, 1 gram of helium in air, weights -6 grams, so in simplest terms, 1 gram of helium can lift 6 grams of stuff (including the ...


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The acceleration of gravity $|g| = 9.81 \frac{m}{s^2}$ since you are moving upward we set this to $g = -9.81 \frac{m}{s^2}$ for the force gravity generates on you is just $F = ma = mg$ where $m $ is your mass in kg what you need to calculate is the Buoyancy force $F_B$ that offsets the gravitational force $F_g$ here is a video that show this for a single ...


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The lift is equal to the weight of the displaced air. The net lift is the difference between the weight of the air, and the weight of the helium displacing it. Air has a density of about 1.2 kg / m3, and helium has a density of about 1/7th of that. The lift of a balloon (ignoring the mass of the balloon) is therefore about 1 kg / m3. Barometric pressure ...


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Any aircraft has potential energy due to its altitude, and kinetic energy due to its velocity. The sum of these is its total energy. If the stick is pushed forward or back, the aircraft simply trades potential energy for kinetic energy or vice-versa, exactly like an earthbound roller-coaster. In order to descend to a landing, the aircraft must dissipate ...


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You mention nothing about the drag on the airplane wing, and although I'm no aerodynamicist I'm pretty sure that an airfoil can't produce lift without producing drag. Add in drag, and your apparent perpetual flight machine fails. Ignore the propeller: think about a glider. Gliders always have a glide slope: they can never maintain speed at the same time as ...


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When the lift produced by the wing is greater than its weight, the wing begins to accelerate vertically. I can see where you're coming from - essentially questioning the physicality of wing lift on the basis of thermodynamics. In a simple conception of the situation, this does seem like a problem. But let's look more closely at the gravitational ...


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I'm not a physicist and I don't have equations to prove what I'm about to say and I could be dead wrong, but I've been thinking of this very question and it led me to this thread. I would argue the Bernoulli principle should act opposite to Magnus effect. The movement of rotation would create the high velocity, low pressure on the opposite side to where the ...



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