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The quick answer here is no. At least not more that you can fly with the help of the centrifugal force. Remember that both of these forces are fictitious forces, so there exists a coordinate system where the forces are zero. Do not get me wrong, i like the way you are thinking. Unfortunately the scenario you are describing is essentially a situation where ...


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Bernouli does not explain wing lift. You can measure an older light plane with a "plank" wing, factor in the wing area, distance over the upper and lower surfaces, cruise speed, and air density, and come up with a total lift figure of about 25% of the aircraft weight. Bernouli equations were published in an aviation text decades ago and the error propagated ...


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UPDATE IN RESPONSE TO YOUR COMMENT I apologise : as you suggest, there might be a lift force on the sphere if there is a shear flow in the fluid (see Discussion in 1st Link). However, this force is likely to be much smaller than the drag on the particle. ...


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The other way around is more intuitive; if the pressure is lower on the right, the fluid would feel a net positive force in that direction and accelerate toward right. hence it will have higher velocity there. So, lower pressure will result in higher velocity. you can rephrase the above in a way that it sounds as what you may like but is not scientifically ...


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1)For net wt 100kg to be lifted in air ,lift has to be greater than equal to 100kg. 2)To produce minimum of 100kg lift ,it depends upon shape,size,weight,angle of attack of wing and lastly speed /velocity of wing/plane.Further velocity depends upon thrust ,total mass and drag(shape of flying machine). In simple words only Forward thrust,total weight and ...



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