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The current cosmological model, lovingly called "the big bang", assumes that the universe went from a very hot, very dense state to the currently observed state of low density and low temperature. So far everything that we have learned about physics tells us that this cooling process was fairly "smooth", with exception of a very rapid early phase that is ...


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There are different layers of reconstruction, at each step the amount of data is reduced with the goal of inferring the momenta, type and direction of the particles produced first in the collision: pulse shape reconstruction: the electronic signals caused by particles interacting with the detector cells are digitized at a rate of 40 MHz at LHC. Some ...


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There experiment which has measured the most stringent limit on neutron to anti-neutron oscillations (i.e. produce neutrons, let them fly for some time and then look if you find anti-neutrons) has used a 130 micrometer thick and 110 cm diameter carbon foil. This target had a probability greater than 99% for anti-neutrons to interact (and thus produce ...


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Detectors at particle colliders are layered like onions around the collision vertex. The CMS detector at CERN First there are charged particle sensitive detectors where charged particles leave tracks because of ionisation, but mass density is low so strong interactions do not happen often; their momentum can be measured by the curvature in the ...


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The energy per proton at the LHC is much larger than what is needed for fusion, protons break up into their constituents easily at this energy and fly away after they interact. In a fusion reactor, one wants the particles to stay within the reactor volume such that the released energy can be transferred to other deuterium/tritium nuclei which then can ...


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Oh, but we do! I'm assuming you mean using the fields to simply collide particles with each other, right? Then that's already being done. For example, take this neat little machine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusor This one runs on the exact same principle you described (though I'm not quite familiar with the inner workings of the LHC). For energy ...



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