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Actually, this might be possible. Mass is proportional to speed and light speed gives the limit at infinity, but this only accounts for particles with mass, for particles without mass this won't affect, I think. The eq. for relative mass becomes infinite for particle with least mass, but not zero mass. For objects with zero mass going at light speed , the ...


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No. Not at the LHC and not at an even more powerful accelerator in the future. Now matter how much energy the accelerated particles acquire, they will never be able to surpass the speed of light. A massive particle like the ones at the LHC, i.e. one with non-vanishing rest mass, will not even reach the speed of light, it will only come arbitrarily close to ...


2

The algorithms used are as many as the experimental setups times the detectors used in the setups. They are built to fit the detectors and not the other way around. The common aspects are a few 1)charged particles interact with matter ionizing it and one builds detectors where the passage of an ionizing particle can be recorded. It can be a bubble ...


0

The actual effective collision energy of the LHC is less than the beam energy, because the machine is not really colliding the protons, but only their constituents, the quarks and gluons. Imagine you are shooting two shotguns at the same point. Instead of the two shells hitting each other, you will, at most, get occasional collisions of the pellets that are ...


1

Well, if you have the time... CERN has all the technical design reports for its detectors online at http://cds.cern.ch/. They are excellent reading material. Start with a search for "ATLAS technical design report" and "CMS technical design report" and work your way trough the references in those documents. Once you understand the geometry of the detectors ...


3

M. Strassler quotes R. Rattazzi as follows: "we can’t rule out the possibility completely, there’s some amount of circumstantial evidence against this new particle being a composite Higgs if it is a composite Higgs, there are some indirect near-term measurements that could well reveal it; completely direct measurements are many years off" Strassler ...


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Physicists collide particles to study their behavior under extreme conditions. New unknown particles can be created in high energy collisions or new unknown processes may be observed. Our equations describing the particles are predicting certain behavior and physicists are testing if the particles really behave like that. And they are hoping to find a ...


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The high energies of the LHC helps in a sense "reproduce" energetic eras of the universe right after the big bang, or even reproduce collisions of high energy particles in space. During those periods of the universe, the energies were high enough for more massive particles to be produced (Recall the more mass a particle has, the more energy it needs to be ...


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In space there are phenomena leading to gigantic energies or temperatures. This can create such particles. In fact, there are collisions of high energy particles in space. We here on earth reproduce these effects using a collider like the LHC. But still the maximum energies per particle we meassure comming to us from space are far from reached with any ...



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