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Life is not so simple, as in all high energy interactions there is a probability of a large number of particles appearing at the main interaction which will subsequently have decays through the weak or electromagnetic interaction. If one sees jets of hadrons in the detectors the strong interaction is involved, but the main vertex may be electromagnetic, ...


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In quantum field theory, vector bosons are subatomic particles known as force carriers which are the quanta of their respective fields. For instance, the photon is the quanta of the electromagnetic field, thereby mediating the electromagnetic force. In particle physics, fundamental forces are seen to arise from the emission and absorption of virtual ...


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In a simple word, particles are thought to be excitations in fields. Particles are not interactions but we notice particles when they interact because we are capable of noticing the change in interaction. (How I see is it's not the EM field that creates photon but photon itself is an excitation of the quantum electromagnetic field.)


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In a simple graspable way? I always go back to the double-slit experiment and the many-worlds interpretation (though that is controversial, I admit). The idea is that the particle is real, but it has taken every conceivable path to the target, each path in a separate world. These worlds have probability amplitude waves, so they can reinforce or cancel, with ...


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Field interaction does not "give rise to particles". In fact, field interaction makes it particularly difficult to speak of particles. To understand how particle states and fields are interrelated, we must employ quantum field theory. This answer of mine roughly sketches how a particle state is defined in QFT - and the fact is that such particle states are ...


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As you said waves have particle nature. The correct statement will be to say that the quantized fluctuations of the field can be visualized as particles. An intuitive example would be to imagine yourself in a pond with no ripples. In such a situation you will not feel any thing but if the pond has ripples then you would feel as if something is hitting you i....


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Let me preface by saying that "coupling" is a favorite physicist word that is perhaps best described linguistically than rigorously; it's deployed in a few different situations. In general, we say that a coupling exists in quantum mechanics if the evolution of one part of the system depends on another quantity, which could be either classical or quantum. I'...


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I think Entanglement may answer your question. Two systems are said to be entangled(coupled) if we cannot assign an independent and separate wavefunctions for each system, instead we define a composite system which is simply the tensor product of the original constitutes. To be precise, in the general case the wavefunction description of any quantum system ...


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Following Garyp's comment; "r , being the radial coordinate, has no knowledge of direction. Another way to see this is to note that the dipole matrix element has to be a vector. Calculating the rr matrix element gives you just one number. Perhaps more to the point: you want to find the matrix element of r⃗ r→, not rr. – garyp" The dipole element should be; ...



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