Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In fact, your question is not so clear. I try my best. The Yukawa potential is an exchange potential, so it is based on the particle which is exchanged between 2 interacting particles. So if that particle (a boson) is coupled to the Higgs boson, it will get mass and the potential between the 2 interacting particles should change from U(r)~1/r to U(r)~ ...


0

I'm not sure what you're asking, but it's not really true to say that particles interact with the Higgs field. A quantum field like the electron field interacts with the Higgs field and the result is that the electron field is massive i.e. its excitations (electrons) have a mass. If you consider the Higgs boson, rather than the Higgs field, then the ...


2

You may always promote "couplings constants" (charge, mass, etc...) to fields. Now, as a physicist, you need to make some contact with reality. So you have to tell why and which field you are using (for instance the Higgs field (up to a constant), which has a $SU(2)$ charge, is used to replace a constant mass coupling in the interaction $m (\bar e_R e_L + ...


1

The Einstein equivalence principle states : The outcome of any local non-gravitational experiment in a freely falling laboratory is independent of the velocity of the laboratory and its location in spacetime. Emphasis added. Note that this principle has done well in explaining quite a few things about gravity. So there is no a priori reason why you ...


-1

I found many explanations for this type of questions http://settheory.net/cosmology http://settheory.net/general-relativity It's better than "The Meaning of Einstein's Equation" (John Baez). In particular - It is directly applied to an important example (universal expansion) - The expression is simpler (relating 1 component of the energy tensor to 3 ...


0

Let us clearly draw the line between two things here, since the question can easily involve opinion based answers, which may also be dubbed non-mainstream (which isn't welcome on this site). 1) The existence of dark matter is generally believed by a majority of the Physics community, since astronomical observations, notably by the Planck space ...


6

Yes, there have been suggestions that such particles exist, and an example is the sterile neutrino. But your question is a little more involved than you might think at first sight. For example if the sterile neutrino only interacts through gravity what interaction caused it to be created in the first place? There is nothing in the Standard Model that could ...


2

This answer is within the current physics and theoretical understanding, which has developed a successful formalism that includes all the experimentally seen particles in the Standard Model. The model has been very successful in predicting several new particles using its symmetry and mathematics, the experimental observation of the Higgs boson serving as ...



Top 50 recent answers are included