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1

Contrary to what the other answer assumes, fog is not made of vater vapour, and light attenuation is not the reason why you can't see through fog. Fog is a suspension of microscopic droplets of liquid water in air. This is the same material we know as "cloud" when it doesn't reach all the way down to the ground. The fog is opaque not because light is ...


2

You will want to refer to the blackbody curve, which will have a broad spectrum and a peak wavelength. Consider the sun for a moment. At a temperature of around 6000 Kelvin the peak wavelength of its blackbody curve will appear around 500nm, which is blueish-green light. But that is obviously not the only wavelengths that the sun is emitting. The ...


7

It sounds like you know some of the most important summary points about blackbody radiation, but here is a reference on the subject, since I will be talking almost entirely about blackbody radiation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-body_radiation Given any temperature, there is a certain emission spectrum (see ...


1

The answer by Tom is correct. I would like to add a few more points about scattering phenomena. Using Raman spectroscopy rotation and vibration of these homo-nuclear molecules are easily probed. (Classically, scattering is explained by induced dipole moment; while Quantum-mechanical treatment is based on the Perturbation theory). However, Raman signal is ...



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