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The spectral radiation rate depends on the material in question and the temperature of the material. You can start to learn about this by Googling "Black Body Radiation" and "Planck" . Your terms "glossy black" and "dull white" are far too vague (in a scientific or engineering sense) to be able to answer. Further, the visual color is not necessarily ...


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To add to the answers so far, here's a outline of a pretty crude calculation you could do. Let's assume the house is in space. That way, we won't have to worry about the other parts of the Earth equilibriating with the house. Now let's assume your house is a perfect blackbody (which may or may not be a good approximation depending on how your house is ...


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Yes. All matter that interacts with light absorbs it to some degree. This is true whether you're discussing UV or infrared or visible light. For example, the earth wouldn't be nearly as warm as it is if it didn't absorb visible light.


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Yes, it would, though not as quickly as if you were getting the full spectrum of sunlight. All frequencies of the light spectrum carry energy, so it becomes a question of how much of that energy is absorbed by the house. For example, if your house was completely black, all that visible light energy would be absorbed by the house and converted into heat. If ...


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Contrary to what the other answer assumes, fog is not made of vater vapour, and light attenuation is not the reason why you can't see through fog. Fog is a suspension of microscopic droplets of liquid water in air. This is the same material we know as "cloud" when it doesn't reach all the way down to the ground. The fog is opaque not because light is ...



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