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Just wanted to point out that the last comment may mislead people. "Entropy, as defined in information theory, is a measure of how random the message is..." Perhaps the writer means a measure of how unpredictable it is, and uses random as a synonym. It's not a good one. If a signal is predictable it is redundant, and redundancy, under scarce resources, is ...


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Particles are described by quantum fields, and the quantum field determines the mass, spin and charge. So for example all electrons (and positrons) have the same mass, spin and (magnitude of) charge because they are all excitations of the electron quantum field. Individual electrons can have different energy and momenta, but I'm guessing you wouldn't ...


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From a classical standpoint, it seems pretty clear that information can be easily lost. Nope, classical mechanics is reversible. It's so reversible that you can't even squeeze the state space: states that start out "very different" stay "very different". Those vague terms are formalized by Liouville's theorem. Because classical mechanics is reversible, ...



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