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3

Four additions to other answers and your questions: I agree with your thoughts about the door. In principle, it can be arbitrarily near to lossless. The work cost does not arise in knowing when to open the door, i.e. in measuring the state of gas particles. This was actually what Leo Szilard thought, as he discussed in 1929 in L Szilard, "Über die ...


0

I think you misinterpreted the quote. Here it is in full: To explain, for example, how the universe could have smoothed itself out to achieve the uniformity of temperature that we observe today in the cosmic background radiation, one finds that in the context of the standard Big Bang theory, it would be necessary for energy and information to be ...


0

The speed of light is constant relative to the fabric of space, but when space itself is expanding, the speed of lighg, as measures by an external obsrver can be larger than c. This is a known fact in general relativity (special relativity doesnt consider such possibility). Update: what has slowed down was the expansion of space itself, with drags the light ...


-3

The problems of the Demon are coming from the randomness. The second law of thermodynamics is just saying, that randomness is spreading through any hole and any obstacles. Just because of it randomness. If you put very complex lock on the way of randomness, it will found the combination sooner or later. It is just the matter of time. So, if Demon ...


2

You can also think of this in terms of information only, without invoking thermodynamics right from the start. So, you just have a system, and you don't know the exact physical state it is in. If we then consider that system including all the features needed to operate Maxwell's demon as a totally isolated system, such that even quantum decoherence is ...


23

The resolution to Maxwell's demon paradox is mostly understood to be through Landauer's principle, and it is one of the most compelling applications of information science to physics. Landauer's principle asserts that erasing information from a physical system will always require performing work, and particularly will require at least $$k_B T \ln(2)$$ of ...


1

This alleged problem falls apart as soon as you do a rigorous analysis. It should be clear that with such random accidents there is no causation. If event A really causes event B, then that's reflected in the state of the system. You'll have a state of the form 1/sqrt(1+|u|^2)[|A B> + u |not(A) not(B)>], so an entangled state containing information about the ...


0

Many-world interpretation can be consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. It is not a problem. Now, about this hypothetical time travel: If you went back in time to tell Shakespeare about his work and he published it after, it looks consistent but it is ultimately a paradox because where does that knowledge come from? Information, or strictly ...



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