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1

So my question is: is this formula, that I frequently encounter in syllabi and books, correct? Where lies my mistake. The procedure $$\mathbf F = \frac{d\mathbf p}{dt} = \frac{d}{dt}(m\mathbf v) = \frac{dm}{dt}\mathbf v + m\mathbf a,$$ is based on the erroneous idea that the equation $$ \mathbf F = \frac{d\mathbf p}{dt} $$ is valid for systems with ...


1

Actually it was that maxwellian electromagnetism had no problems, in contrast to the newtonian classical mechanics framework. Theory of Relativity alters the Newtonian framework not the Maxwellian framework. i would say that even if Einstein hadn't invented SR, someone else would (as indeed many others notably Poincare, Lorentz et al) were alredy on the ...


2

Option 4, none of the above. Your option 1 is wrong because points don't rotate. Your option 2 is closer to correct, but ultimately still wrong. You're overly hung up on points (the origin). It might help to get a handle on what "rotation" is. Points don't rotate. Better said, a rotated point is indistinguishable from the original. What about one ...


0

A very late answer, one that I hope adds to the excellent answers by Mark and LuboŇ°. From the perspective of Newtonian mechanics, there's nothing wrong per se with using a geocentric point of view. Such a point of view does require adding fictitious forces and torques that would otherwise be absent in an inertial perspective, but if makes sense to do that, ...



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