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The things I learnt in years of pinewood derby racing: use the maximum weight keep it at the back make sure the car tracks straight focus on stability The weight is your "engine". Since you start at a slope, mass at the back has further to drop than mass at the front (really!). You can think about it like this: if the weight of the car is evenly ...


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Disclaimer: This answer was written before I found out that a pinewood derby is for miniature wooden cars that run in a track. Therefore, only part of it will apply to a pinewood derby. As I understand your situation, you will be traveling down an incline and then on to a horizontal surface. You are saying you want to maximize the effect of gravitational ...


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It depends on if the object being placed is moving at the same exact speed and direction as the car when placed inside. If so then nothing will happen but if different then the speed or direction of the car will change.


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Inertia is the term we use to say that an object can't change its velocity without a force acting on it. This does mean that a force always changes the velocity of an object (if net force is not zero). The wall scenario is a bit different because the wall will feel the force and will try to change its motion accordingly but in this case, inertia has less to ...


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Momentum and inertia are closely related properties. Newton's first law states that an object will continue in a straight line with constant momentum if no net external forces act on it. When you apply the brakes, the road applies a net external force on the car-plus-wheels. This force will cause the car to slow down, and the road to speed up (conservation ...


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From when I worked among missile engineers, accelerometers were used, along with gyroscopes (mechanical or laser). I don't know of 6th order differential equations. I do know of 3rd order, namely in the steering by swiveling the engine nozzle. Specifically, the engine nozzle angle is off-center by a certain amount, causing an angular acceleration (2nd ...


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Here's a hint, We know $I=MR^2$ (considering point mass) from the axis of rotation where $R$ is the perpendicular distance from axis of rotation. Since each point mass is moving with a constant velocity in the same direction, it means that perpendicular distance from axis of rotation remains same. So you can calculate moment of inertia of each point mass ...


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"For sake of simplicity lets take both objects rigid particles." Well, we can't both do this and answer your question. In such a model, we really just imagine that the particles experience an infinite force for an infinitesimally small amount of time (a dirac delta function). So in this model, momentum is mysteriously acquired instantly. In reality, the ...



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