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Let's assume that the wheels aren't able to turn. That means the frictional coefficient is kinetic in nature because the car is skidding across the surface...assuming you already overcame static friction. The frictional force is as follows: $$f=u_{k}*m*g$$ You apply a force that opposes and overcomes the kinetic frictional force that is resisting your ...


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The mass of an object in a physics problem doesn't matter to that objects behavior when all the forces that act on it are fractions of the objects weight so that the acceleration has the from $$\vec{a} = \frac{\vec{F}}{m} = \frac{\vec{k}m}{m} = \vec{k} \,,$$ for some vector $k$. This is true of idealized projectiles and idealized objects siding down ramps ...


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I think inertia doesn't depend on speed, it depends on rate of change in speed, i.e. acceleration. The higher you accelerate the more will be the inertia. It can be understood by taking an example of a motorcycle, in which lower gear gives more traction than the higher one. The higher the acceleration you want the more traction is required due to inertia. ...


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Let's first address the general question--do "waves" of any kind have (or can they have) inertia? I suppose here by "inertia" you mean "resistance to changes in velocity." This is certainly true of waves in, say, water--you've certainly felt resistance to your hand if you sweep it through water to make a wave; the destructive force of a tsunami is a more ...


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TDSE TISE Here you have the time dependent and independent Schrodinger wave equations, respectively. These relate to the energy of particles, but the trident symbol, Psi is representative of the actual wave equation I believe you are referring to. While De Broglie and schrodinger and others like them do describe particles as behaving like waves, they ...


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To measure anything, first you need a reference. For example, suppose you want to measure length in terms of meter. There is a particular length which is accepted by everyone as a meter. You say something is so many meters long by calculating how many meter-lengths fit into it, i.e. you take a ratio of length to be measured to standard-meter and express the ...


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In Newtons three laws of motion, its the second law that introduces the concept of mass, here its the linking term between force applied on an object and the motion or acceleration that results. The more 'stuff' there in the object, that is the more mass it has, the harder it is to accelerate it. That is, it has more inertia; so we call this concept of mass, ...


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Einstein had his "happiest thought" about his equivalence principle one day as he imagined himself in freefall towards the earth. A typical mind wouldve thought "okay, so i feel as though im floating" but Einstein and his fabulous mind thought about it a different way. Einstein connected his freefall with being in motion outside of a gravitational source ...


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The gravitational mass, $m_g$, gives you the strength of the gravitational interaction while the inertial mass, $m_i$, represents the inertia of the body. The first one is the mass appearing in the Universal Gravitation Law while the second one is the mass appearing in the Newton's second law. The equality between these masses is an empirical fact noticed ...



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