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See moment of inertia is analogous to mass. Moment of inertia can be thought of as a physical "property" of the object similar to that of mass. And as we know that mass does not depend on any force or gravitational field or any other external effect, so does moment of inertia. Hope this answers your question.


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Like Wikipedia says: "Moment is a combination of a physical quantity and a distance." This 'physical quantity' could be various things. To take the examples you mention: Moment of momentum (commonly known as angular momentum) is expressed as $\vec{L}=\vec{r}\times m\vec{v}$, and is a measure for the rotational momentum of an object around some axis. Moment ...


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The answer is two arcs. One arc with a constant gee loading in one direction and then flipping to the opposite direction. This is called the bang-bang method, and it is no very smooth, but the gee forces never exceed the specified maximum. Given a path $y(x)$ the instantaneous radius of curvature at each x is $$ \rho = \frac{ \left(1+ \left(\frac{{\rm ...


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Potential energy and inertia are related via Einstein's famous equation $E = mc^2$. A compressed spring has more potential energy and therefore more inertial mass compared to an uncompressed one, making it more difficult to accelerate because of its increased inertia.


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Potential energy depends upon the presence of a force, and the actual configuration of objects. So a rock at the top of a cliff has potential energy $U=mgh$, due to $m$, the mass of the rock, $g$, the acceleration due to gravity, and $h$, the height of the cliff. Inertia, as described by Newton's First Law of Motion, is that property of matter which, in ...


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No, more force is required because of the higher spring constant. If the spring with the higher spring constant happens to have more mass, then inertia will come into play, but consider the following you can have two springs with different spring constant and same mass the expansion of a spring can be done arbitrarily slowly so that inertia (which opposes ...


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Newton's 1st law states, as you rightly say, that a force-free body maintains its state of motion. (This also holds in relativity.) Newton's 2nd law states, that if there is a net force on the body, the body will accelerate in the direction of that force, $\vec{F}=m\vec{a}$. (This will be altered a bit in relativity, but for simplicity, let's stick with ...


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Science never answers "why" questions, so in a strict sense there is no such explanation, but one can try to triangulate where we stand, at the moment. In classical physics space, time and the existence of massive bodies are inexplicable pre-physical facts. Inertia then becomes an observed property of massive bodies that allows to differentiate them by ...


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Answer:1 Mass is just a form of potential energy of a gravity wave of relativistic bent time space and light is a gravitational wave of bent space, when it travels at the velocity of C, where time relativistically slows down. At that velocity (with time dilation) it makes a gravity wave into the photon. because it is traveling relativistic-ally it is slowing ...


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Assume that your external force $F$ was applied at some distance $r$ from the centre of mass of the spool. To satisfy the rolling condition the linear acceleration of the centre of mass $a$ must equal the radius $R$ of the spool times its angular acceleration about the centre of mass $\alpha$. $a = R \alpha$ Just suppose that there is no friction and ...


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This question touches on the distinction between weight and mass which are used confusingly synonymously in many Western everyday-languages (not so in e.g. Russian). Weight is the force of gravity pulling you down. It is proportional to the object's mass which explains the confusing everyday usage of the word. A bathroom scale really measures the force ...



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