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Wow...I have read the answers of some 5 years ago and feeling surprised that nobody knows physics here! Newton says: sum of internal forces is always zero PROVIDED THAT there is no chemical/biological conversion(of energy). That means the energy of the system shall remain same also. In case of a vibrating phone, the stored electrical energy converts into ...


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I want to focus on one thing, here. The nature of the normal force. You write Doesn't normal force oppose any other force? which is a easy impression to get when you are introduced to the normal force in the context of things sitting on other things in a gravitational field, but that's not the best way to think about it. The normal force keeps ...


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Wanted to give a different angle to thinking about this. Since you mentioned you wanted to consider this from the inertial frame (non rotating), then there is indeed no (fictitious) force. But in that frame, we can consider the water is indeed falling; however, the rate at which the bucket is also "falling" is such that the two stay together - in other ...


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In the bucket experiment when the bucket reaches the top of the circle why will it have a normal force acting on the water downwards? The normal contact force is exerted by the bottom of the bucket as explicitly mentioned by the author. So, it is acting downward when the bucket is inverted. Doesn't normal force oppose any other force? There is no ...


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Imagine a scenario where the bucket is rotated at just the right speed so that the centripetal acceleration required to keep the water on a circular path is exactly 9.81 $ms^{-1}$. Then at the top of the rotation, all the centripetal acceleration is supplied by gravity. However the bucket might be rotating faster in any given scenario but it still rotates ...


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Lower mass means lower weight, faster acceleration, and faster speed. You didn't understand the problem correctly. A bike moving in a straight line is kept in an unstable equilibrium. The greater the weight, the less stable the equilibrium.


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Yes, both the internal potential energy and the internal kinetic energy of a bound system (in the rest frame of its center of mass) contribute to the bound system's inertial mass according to $E=mc^2$. For a paper discussing the evidence that this is true for internal kinetic energy in particular, see Kinetic Energy and the Equivalence Principle.


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Theoretically, the answer is yes. However, looking at the practicality of the situation, the answer is no. The photons can not be contained inside the box unless they are either 1. Created inside the box itself, or 2. They are trapped beforehand, and then brought inside the box. In 1., they do not add to inertia because, they are created using energy ...


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Yes, mass and energy are equivalent. A more competent relativist might be able to give you the complete description, but to first order you can say that the mass of an object is simply the total energy in its volume divided by c^2. That mass is equivalent to the inertial mass by the weak equivalence principle, which is a cornerstone of GR. That is to say, ...


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Yes! In fact, this kind of phenomenon is very common. For example, the mass of a proton is much greater than the sum of the masses of the constituent quarks. Much of the extra mass comes from the gluons that bind the quarks together; like photons, gluons are massless, but they contribute to the inertia.


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If a body of mass m hanged on a string is moving, let uniformly, on a circle fixed relatively to the ground, then an observer G on the ground uses the 2nd Newton Law : $$ \mathbf{F}=m\cdot \mathbf{a} \tag{01} $$ and finds the relation between the force $\mathbf{F}$ and the acceleration $\mathbf{a}$. For observer G there exists a "real" force, the tension ...


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Note that you have to swing the pail with a certain minimum speed for the water to stay in. That minimum speed is such that when the pail is at the top of the arc, the rope accelerates the pail downward faster than gravity accelerates the water downward. Otherwise, the water falls out.


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If water particles move in a circular path its because of some net force towards the centre. This net force is usually called "centripetal force". Don't ever put centrifugal force into the description. It is not a force, but just a name of the "feeling" that your body (or in this case water particles) want to move out of the circular motion but can't.


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See moment of inertia is analogous to mass. Moment of inertia can be thought of as a physical "property" of the object similar to that of mass. And as we know that mass does not depend on any force or gravitational field or any other external effect, so does moment of inertia. Hope this answers your question.



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