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36

That's not true, Newtons's laws do not say that. What's important here is conservation of momentum. Inside the phone, there is an oscillating mass. While the mass inside has a momentum and thus a velocity in one direction, the (friction-free) phone has to have the same momentum in the opposite direction. It "vibrates". Homework: Get on a skateboard (best ...


20

From here: Higgs is an atheist, and is displeased that the Higgs particle is nicknamed the "God particle", because the term "might offend people who are religious".Usually this inappropriate nickname for the Higgs boson is attributed to Leon Lederman, the author of the book The God Particle: If the Universe Is the Answer, What Is the Question?, but the ...


15

At least one mobile phone I've heard about uses an unbalanced spinning weight. As the weight moves in one direction, the phone moves in the other, in accordance with Newton's Third Law of Motion.


14

On the whole, static friction is higher than dynamic friction. This means that if you can brake without your wheels skidding, you will come to a halt more quickly. So let's assume that the truck brakes without skidding, and see where that gets us. Let's assume that your truck has weight $W = Mg$ with a haystack with additional weight $w = mg$ on top. ...


14

Not to detract from Floris' answer, but I think this is an instance where it is nice to think in terms of limits. If the hay is tied down, you're stopping an object with mass (truck + hay). If the hay isn't tied down, but on a sufficiently sticky surface such that it doesn't move, it should be the same as stopping it if it were fixed, since the outcome is ...


12

When the cosmonaut sneezed they would start moving, and rotating, in the opposite direction, but when the sneeze hit their faceplate (ugh!) this would stop the motion. The net result is that the velocity of the cosmonaut would not have changed, but their position and angle would have. According to Wikipedia a typical breath is 500cm$^3$ and a sneeze ...


9

The term "God Particle" is used only by journalists. It's a wholly inappropriate term and I'd be very surprised if any physicist used it (outside of the lower end popular science TV programmes). General Relativity tells us that inertial and gravitation mass is the same thing. The Standard Model isn't going to say anything directly about gravitational mass ...


8

The answer depends on the identity of the dark matter. In the most widely believed scenario, dark matter is composed of "weakly interacting massive particles" ("WIMP"). The adjective "weak" really means that the particles interact via the weak nuclear force. This pretty much guarantees that they interact with the Higgs boson, too: the WIMPs carry the ...


8

Similar questions are: "why does electric charge happen?" and "why does gravity happen?" etc. The "art" of physics is in the identification of the fundamental "stuff", stuff for which the question "why" is actually misguided. You see, if there are fundamental "things" then, by the definition of "fundamental", these are the givens that we accept without ...


7

Yes the things/humans inside the vessel will keep going forward due to inertia. Since the things/humans have kinetic energy due to motion, they would keep moving. Whether the cabin is oxygened is not important: If you are comparing between a vessel filled with oxygen (or some other gas) and a vacuum vessel, the difference would be that the things/humans ...


7

going very fast and suddently stops (maybe it is not possible but that is not the point) Well, "stops" isn't actually well defined, but if it is subject to a thrust "backwards" any unsecured contents will all bang up against the "forward" bulkheads. So, the answer is to your first part is yes. Now, if there is an atmosphere present that will also ...


6

The thing you throw in the air is also traveling at the same speed you are, in the same direction. When you throw it up, it doesn't matter that the earth below is moving backwards at speed, nor that the moon is moving past even more quickly, nor that the earth itself is spinning and moving relative to the sun. The ball has a speed and direction and ...


6

The reason Leon Lederman made up the name "God particle" is because anything with "God" in it sells books. So he called the Higgs the God particle, to sell books. The term didn't catch on, but he sold a lot of books.


6

Inertia does not suddenly "break" in the sense that the axis will remain fixed until some force threshold is reached, and move thereafter (for that matter, an ice skater cannot change direction by any clever combination of heel-toe maneuvering). In reality, any change in the mass distribution of the earth will move the orientation of the axis. Small changes ...


6

Inertial mass describes an object's resistance to change in velocity. The more inertial mass something has, the harder it will be to change its velocity. Gravitational mass describes an object's ability to attract other matter (and under GR, to curve spacetime). The more gravitational mass something has, the more attracted to it other things will be. When ...


6

The distance from London to Australia is about 17,000km. If you wanted to minimise the acceleration you'd feel during the trip you'd accelerate continuously for the first half of the journey (8,500km) then decelerate at the same rate for the second half. To work out what acceleration is required you use the SUVAT equation: $$ s = ut + \frac{1}{2}at^2 $$ ...


5

The author appears to be assuming that $a$ is indeterminate in an empty universe. That assumption fits in nicely with some people's philosophical preconceptions (including Mach's), but of course we don't know it to be true. In particular, in general relativity, one can have an empty universe described by good old special-relativistic Minkowski spacetime. In ...


5

I have to start by saying I don't know anything about the derivative method shown in this excerpt. I tried some calculations but it doesn't even seem to give the same result as the standard definition, so I'm guessing he is calculating something different from what we call "moments" in modern physics. Anyway, by way of explanation: The word "moment" is ...


5

The concept of inertia is indeed useful in two ways. I think your notion of it as a technical promotion of the everyday word "sloth" (without the baggage given it by the Roman Catholic translation of the "deadly sin" Ἀκηδία) as extremely close to the mark. In physics the notion of "inertia" has two, very alike uses: The first is practical, through a weak ...


5

Further to Damon Blevins's pithy answer, you need to be stating what an inertial frame is, so that you can measure your acceleration. A practical answer: you carry with you an accelerometer, and if this measures "nought" then Damon's formulation is good and Newton's first law is that in the absence of any nett force on it, a body will be either comoving with ...


4

If we take the free body diagram above and sum the moments about the center of mass, we would find that an increased applied force would in fact cause the solid body to rotate. Perhaps. Or additional forces can appear. If I push up on my car's bumper, a rotational force is being applied. But the normal force on the wheel farther from me ...


4

Inertia is an intrinsic characteristic of the object related to its mass. Inertia tells you how much force it will take to cause a particular acceleration on the object. Momentum is a function of an object's mass and velocity. Momentum is a measure of the kinetic energy of the object. A massive object can have any momentum (at least as long as its velocity ...


4

Momentum: The resistance of an object to a change in its state of motion. That sounds like a fishy definition of momentum to me. A slightly better definition, at least at your level, is that momentum represents the "amount of motion" an object has. Granted, "amount of motion" is a very vague term, but it stands to reason that if "amount of motion" were ...


4

The first law is really just the statement that intertial frames exist.


4

If you have the same mass, then the fluted beam will be more rigid because the second moment of area is larger - in the same way that an $\mathrm{I}$ beam is more rigid than a circular rod of the same mass. In the case of a gun barrel, lighter weight helps in a number of ways - portability, ability to hold the gun still as you aim... but making it lighter ...


4

Essentially, the second law is the mathematical formulation of the first one, f=ma, f being the unbalanced force acting upon the other body.


4

It does do work: it's causing the water in the wake of the boat to move downstream faster than the rest of the current. The engine is doing work on the water, rather than doing work on the boat.



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