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0

Lenz's Law says that in any conductor the current flows in first cycle it was take more current due to more magnetizing the coil that is before starting the first half cycle , at the same time the flux is again cross over the conductor emf is induced in it (same coil), so induced emf is opposite direction to oppose the current up to half cycle. After 90 ...


0

I will describe how to make something that acts the way the inductor acts so then it should be clear. Imagine you didn't have the inductor and you replaced it with a wire. Then current would flow through the wire. Now imagine that there are tons of little batteries there not hooked up. Some pointing one way some pointing the other way. Now a battery only ...


0

My question is why does that emf cause a decrease in the rate of change of current through the inductor The emf doesn't 'cause' a change in the rate of change of inductor current but it is, however, consistent with the rate of change in inductor current. The fact is that the rate of change of current, the associated rate of change of magnetic field, ...


7

There is no analogy of "voltage", "current", "charge" or "flux" to electromagnetism for the weak force, at least none that would be helpful. The reason for this is that all of these are classical concepts, while the notion of the weak force is completely quantum. Taking the classical limit just makes it vanish because the classical force law of forces with ...


-7

Are there analogs to resistance, inductance, capacitance, and memristance connecting the weak force to electromagnetism? Yes, but not the way you're thinking. Take a look at weak interaction on Wikipedia and note this: "The first type is called the 'charged-current interaction' because it is mediated by particles that carry an electric charge (the W+ ...


1

In a resistor $I=\frac{V}{R}$. If somehow the current was less, ie a switch was just closed, it would increase until it matched the equation. This is because if the current was less, then the back emf from the resistor would not equal the driving emf and thus current would want to increase. Since in this model there is no inductance, there's nothing to ...


3

First of all, don't mix up voltage with current. In your examples 1 and 2 it is certainly true that the voltages across the resistor and inductor are the same w.r.t. the source voltage. This is just Kirchhoff's voltage law. However, this still results in a current lag in the inductor compared to the resistor. Say the source voltage is $\Delta V_S = V_0 ...



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