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There 3 rather simple formulas which allow to compute the parameters that are asked for. $L'=\mu/(2\pi) \cdot \ln(b/a)$ for the inductivity per meter L' $C'=2\pi\epsilon/(\ln(b/a))$ for the capacity per meter C' $Z= Z_0/2\pi \sqrt{\frac{\mu'}{\epsilon'}}\ln(b/a)$. b is the outer diameter and a is the inner diameter of the coaxial line $Z_0 = ...


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As you slide the switch open, it doesn't instantly transition from zero resistance to infinite resistance. As the contact area decreases the resistance rises, which acts upon the current to produce a voltage operating against the current. Even when the contact resistance becomes zero, there is capacitance across the gap, which produces a rapidly rising ...


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Why does it maintain the status quo? There is energy stored in the magnetic field, and the magnetic field is proportional to the current. In order for the current to change, the magnetic field must change. By conservation of energy, that means the magnetic field energy must be transformed to some other kind of energy. Until you provide a mechanism ...


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The information about inductors you were given is not quite correct. Inductors resist a change in current flow, just like capacitors resist a change in voltage. When an inductor is switched into the circuit, the current starts to increase quickly, but the increasing magnetic field impedes the current. As the current increases, the magnetic field gets ...


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Start with thinking of the case that you have lossless inductive loop in which the stationary (dc) current flows indefinitely, so then no loss and no current decay. Now assume that the sinusoid current is so large that the dissipation per cycle is insignificant when compared to the magnetic energy ("high Q") case, so that you have a constant amplitude ...


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You do have a problem, in the sense that even if you had no wire, a loop with self inductance could have lots of different currents running through it. But let's see what we get. We need names to be clear, so let $I_w$ be the current in the wire and let $I_l$ be the current in the loop. Let the flux due to $I_w$ be $KI_w$ and let the flux due to $I_l$ be ...


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A magnetic field is determined by the current and a changing electric field. And it has energy just for existing. It takes energy to make the magnetic field, for instance to increase the current, and you get energy back when magnetic fields decrease in strength. For a common inductor the magnetic field and associated stored energy are due solely to the ...


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Only some circuits can have such a representation. Such circuits can be represented as a resistor in series with an inductor in series with a capacitor. This is hardly the only circuit possible. For instance, an electrolytic capacitor is sometimes (depending on the use being considered) represented as a cascade of resistors and capacitors, with each ...


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Good questioning. I don't know for sure what eventually lead us to adopt the paradigm of RLC circuits, but do know that the physics of electrical circuits deals with the way energy flows. In a circuit energy can be stored in the form of magnetic or electrical fields, and so the inductor and capacitor manage that capability. Energy can also be lost, and thus ...



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