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As with all such problems, you will have to apply Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws at each loop and node respectively, then combine the equations and solve them. In this case, the time dependence comes from the inductor, as the voltage across it is given by $V_L = L \frac{dI}{dt}$, where $I$ is the (time-dependent) current flowing through it. Thus, you ...


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For a series RL circuit with DC source and switch, there is a problem with opening the switch after it has been closed for some time. In the context of ideal circuit theory, the current through an inductor must be continuous since the voltage across is proportional the time derivative of the current through. Put less rigorously, if the inductor current is ...


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This would actually be easier to answer over at the EE stackexchange site since there is a handy schematic editor built in. First, note that, by speaker wire, we're actually referring to a speaker cable; in this case, a pair of wires. For each wire, we can assign a series resistance and inductance (per foot), i.e., the $R$ and $L$ of each wire is in series ...


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If you take a simple circuit of battery-switch-inductor, and close the switch, at the moment of closing the inductor sees a voltage but no current, because the current has to build up over time, as energy is put into the magnetic field. If instead of a battery you have an AC source and no switch, voltage and current across the inductor are out of phase, so ...


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Is it possible for an inductor to have a voltage across it without any current passing through it ? Yes, if electromotive force due to core counteracts the applied voltage by the rest of the network. For harmonic driving voltage the current oscillates harmonically so this occurs only at one instant.



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