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I believe the confusion is that you believe pressure will always increase as temperature increases. This is only the case in a closed environment such as inside the tire. In an environment such as the atmosphere which is, essentially, in an unconfined environment, the density will decrease with temperature as well. This does not happen inside of a closed ...


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You have a mistake in the line $$ΔV= (.0314m^2)(.002m)$$ Note that 2 cm = 0.02 m, not 0.002 m...


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When a ball bounces lower each time, it loses kinetic energy. This is a result of internal friction - the kinetic energy is converted to internal heating. When two atoms bounce off each other inelastically, where does the energy go? I can think of two mechanisms. The first is heating. In that case, one of the atoms must get the energy, because that's how ...


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The simplest possible answer is that in a closed system the lowest entropy state is one where the temperature is (statistically) uniform.


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As the comments to the question have stated, in real gasses ( contrasted to ideal gasses which just bounce around elastically) there exist both elastic and inelastic scatterings controlled by quantum mechanical interactions. Photons are generated leading to what we call Black Body radiation and an isolated gas volume will lose energy according to the ...


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It is a case of flow through an orifice. It depends on the shape and area of the orifice, and on the viscocity of the fluid. At a low ratio of pressure to viscocity, flow rate is proportional to pressure. At a high ratio of pressure to viscocity, flow rate is proportional to square root of pressure. You're going to have to write a differential equation, and ...


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You can consider this to be true for any parcel of air, even in the open. In the real world however, there are usually added dynamics due to convection mechanisms (i.e. winds and the sort) that screw this up. But a good for instance would be a bubble out of a divers snorkel, in depth. the boundary for the bubble is in no way rigid, and the bubble expands ...


3

Yes you are right. The 10kg piston acts as a force over the area of the piston, increasing the pressure and decreasing the volume of the gas inside. When the set up is tilted, the force no longer acts on the gas, but sideways, so the pressure equalizes.


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You can get nothing out of equilibrium thermodynamic considerations for the rate at which pressure will equalize. What will matter is the speed of sound in the gas, as that is the rate at which density fluctuations travel in a fluid and assuming an equation of state, say $p(\rho)=\rho^{\gamma}$, the pressure is then enslaved to the density. So the sound ...


1

Unless the two containers are separate, i.e. have a wall sealing them off completely, the right set of tools for this question is fluid-dynamics rather than thermodynamics. for the sealed off problem, assuming ideal gasses, the end state for the coupled baths will be that of equal temperature. in that case it is essential you have the right number of ...


2

The Earth's atmosphere is mostly nitrogen and oxygen, both of whose behaviors are very close to ideal at the temperatures and pressures found in the atmosphere. Nitrogen, the dominant gas in the atmosphere, comes particularly close to exhibiting ideal behavior. Gaseous oxygen exhibits about a 3% departure at 20 atmospheres at standard temperature, with ...


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Look at the definition of ideal gas . An ideal gas is a theoretical gas composed of many randomly moving point particles that do not interact except when they collide elastically. The ideal gas concept is useful because it obeys the ideal gas law, a simplified equation of state, and is amenable to analysis under statistical mechanics. One mole of an ...


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There's actually not one simple answer to your question, which is why you are a bit confused. To specify your problem fully, you must specify exactly how and whether the gas swaps heat with its surroundings and how or even whether it is compressed. You should always refer to the full gas law $P\,V=n\,R\,T$ when reasoning. Common situations that are ...



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