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Rising bubbles of air in a liquid oftentimes are anything but spherical. These bubbles have haphazard shapes because they are rising and because they are interacting with other nearby bubbles. The combination of drag, turbulence, and mutual interactions prevents those bubbles from taking on a nice, simple spherical shape. Here's a rather non-spherical ...


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The thing you'll notice about a sphere is that it's symmetrical. very symmetrical. No matter how you rotate it, it looks the same. the surface tension pulls the surface of the bubble into a shape that has even surface tension over the entire bubble. The shape with even surface tension is a sphere. a sphere has the smallest possible surface area for an ...


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It is a case of flow through an orifice. It depends on the shape and area of the orifice, and on the viscocity of the fluid. At a low ratio of pressure to viscocity, flow rate is proportional to pressure. At a high ratio of pressure to viscocity, flow rate is proportional to square root of pressure. You're going to have to write a differential equation, and ...


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You can consider this to be true for any parcel of air, even in the open. In the real world however, there are usually added dynamics due to convection mechanisms (i.e. winds and the sort) that screw this up. But a good for instance would be a bubble out of a divers snorkel, in depth. the boundary for the bubble is in no way rigid, and the bubble expands ...


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Yes you are right. The 10kg piston acts as a force over the area of the piston, increasing the pressure and decreasing the volume of the gas inside. When the set up is tilted, the force no longer acts on the gas, but sideways, so the pressure equalizes.


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You can get nothing out of equilibrium thermodynamic considerations for the rate at which pressure will equalize. What will matter is the speed of sound in the gas, as that is the rate at which density fluctuations travel in a fluid and assuming an equation of state, say $p(\rho)=\rho^{\gamma}$, the pressure is then enslaved to the density. So the sound ...


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Unless the two containers are separate, i.e. have a wall sealing them off completely, the right set of tools for this question is fluid-dynamics rather than thermodynamics. for the sealed off problem, assuming ideal gasses, the end state for the coupled baths will be that of equal temperature. in that case it is essential you have the right number of ...


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The Earth's atmosphere is mostly nitrogen and oxygen, both of whose behaviors are very close to ideal at the temperatures and pressures found in the atmosphere. Nitrogen, the dominant gas in the atmosphere, comes particularly close to exhibiting ideal behavior. Gaseous oxygen exhibits about a 3% departure at 20 atmospheres at standard temperature, with ...


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Look at the definition of ideal gas . An ideal gas is a theoretical gas composed of many randomly moving point particles that do not interact except when they collide elastically. The ideal gas concept is useful because it obeys the ideal gas law, a simplified equation of state, and is amenable to analysis under statistical mechanics. One mole of an ...


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There's actually not one simple answer to your question, which is why you are a bit confused. To specify your problem fully, you must specify exactly how and whether the gas swaps heat with its surroundings and how or even whether it is compressed. You should always refer to the full gas law $P\,V=n\,R\,T$ when reasoning. Common situations that are ...


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But what if the pressure in the balloon increases? Doesn't it make sense that the balloon would want to expand? That is, that as pressure increases, volume increases. This seems to contradict Boyle's Law. In simple words: If you increase the pressure in the balloon and let it expand, then the pressure in the balloon is not really increasing, as you are ...


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The two scenarios you mentioned both are correct, “the pressure $p$ has different sign from other generalized force, if we increase the pressure, the volume increases, whereas if we increase the force, $Y$, for all other cases, the extensive variable, $x$, decreases”.[1] There is no conflict between the two scenarios. [1] L.E.Reichl, A Modern Course in ...


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It is reasonably easy: the balloon will want to maintain pressure equilibrium with its surroundings, i.e. $P_{in} = P_{out}$. This occurs because any pressure imbalance can be redressed on the sound-crossing time scale, i.e. the time it takes a sound wave to cross the balloon's diameter. This can easily be checked to be less than a millisecond, thus on ...



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