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Effectively ideal gases are pretty easy to come by. Air at SATP would be a good example. To be a little more precise, what you're looking for is that the mean free path $\lambda \gg \sigma$, the diameter of the molecules. Basically this just means that molecules spend most of their time far away from each other. You can find $\lambda$ by: ...


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Almost there. Since this looks like a homework question I'll just give a hint. The force balance equation is due to the buoyancy force which is due to the difference in density inside the ballon vs. outside the ballon. Once you work that out, the weight that you missing will come back into the equation.


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The air inside the balloon is less dense than the air outside; this difference is what causes the lift for the balloon. When you heat the air in the balloon, it expands until the balloon is full. At this point the balloon is still on the ground since there is not enough lift. You need to heat the air more, which expands the air more and causes some of the ...


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Start with an ideal gas, $$ V=\frac{nRT}p $$ Then take the natural logarithm of this: $$ \ln V=\ln T+\ln\frac{nR}{p} $$ The derivative of both sides with respect to $T$ gives $$ \frac{d\ln V}{dT}=\frac{d\ln T}{dT}+\frac{d\ln\frac{nR}{p}}{dT}=\frac{d\ln T}{dT}=\frac{1}{T} $$ where we assume an isobaric situation so that $p$ contributes nothing. The left hand ...


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Thermodynamics has simple answers to offer regarding reversibility or otherwise of a given process. For a process to be reversible, it must be reversible at every point along the path ie, the system must be in equilibrium, both internally having well defined values for its properties such as temperature, pressure , internal energy etc., and externally with ...


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In hydrodynamics, conservation means that what flows into the control volume is equivalent to the flow out of the control volume. With respect to momentum, we mean precisely that any change in momentum of the fluid within a control volume is due to the net flow of fluid into the volume and the action of external forces on the fluid within the volume ...


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Once you have the two laws for isothermic and isochoric processes for a perfect gas, you can deduce the state equation. We assume that there exists a “set of possible configurations $(P,V,T)$”, where the two laws (isothermal, isochoric) are both satisfied: $$PV=\phi (T),\quad T=P\xi (V),$$ for some functions $\phi,\xi$. We can then show that $\phi$ is the ...


-2

According to Boyle's law: At constant temperature a volume gas is inversely proportionally to applied pressure this is boyle's law.


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To my knowledge, there isn't a specific term for these types of gasses. In your question you name "substance" while you list elements. Many different molecules are gaseous at room temperature; however, only a few of the elements are. I'll look at both. They come from different parts of the periodic table but do have a couple of features in common: ...


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The volume of a fixed mass of gas is inversely proportional to its pressure at constant temperature . This is known as Boyle's law. P1 V1=P2 V2 PV =a constant P inversely proportional to 1/V at constant T. PV = a constant T. This is mathematical equation or algebraic law for Boyele's law.


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"Quick" and "slow" always has to be compared to something. It is perhaps a shortcoming of most books on thermodynamics that they do not explicitly state what that something is, though perhaps it is also because it's a bit tricky to explain. The scenario that one always imagines is a gas in a compartment in a piston. A realistic system of this sort will have ...


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Intro Ideal types of thermodynamic processes are quasistatic and reversible and they are imprinted as constant graphic functions. !(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adiabatic_process#mediaviewer/File:Adiabatic.svg) Quasi static adiabatic processes are the ideal types of adiabatic processes. An ideal or fictive quasi-static adiabatic transfer of energy as work ...


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Theoretically, the radial distribution should be symmetric. However, in jets in general it is well know that there will be a transition from purely laminar (i.e. symmetry preserving) to purely turbulent (breaks the symmetry). Have a look at this video. The presence of the plasma induces the turbulence at much earlier in space compared to when it is absent. ...



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