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Since both are at the same temperature, both have the same degree of hotness ie. Temperature, hence similarly cold or hot. The difference is that water and ice both have different enthalpies, Water when converted to ice requires only phase change enthaply(assuming water to be at 273K), the enthalpy of freezing is then, Q(f) = ml


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The one that absorbs more heat from you will cool you more, and seem colder. But it isn't entirely straightforward. If you pour water in your hand, water will flow to fit you. An ice cube will not make as good contact. Water in contact with you will warm. It can then flow away and be replaced by fresh cold water. Ice doesn't flow On the other hand, Ice ...


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To get the ice cube to twirl by pure twirling of the glass, there need to be viscous stresses applied to the ice cube from the spinning water. To simplify matters, lets say that the water in your glass is perfectly still before you start twirling, that the ice cube is away from the edge of the glass, and that the twirling is initiated smoothly so that ...


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Let us make an mental experiment. Suppose that there is no friction between the glass and the water inside. In this case, if you rotate the glass, the water inside and the ice cube will just stay still. This is because the angular momentum of the water and of the ice cube is conserved, since in this case no torque is applied to the water, i.e., there is no ...


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If the liquid were really rotating in the glass, the ice cubes would rotate with it. What you are (probably) seeing is the superposition of two perpendicular resonant waves sloshing back and forth, but not rotating. Here is how it works: Imagine that, instead of moving the glass in a circle, you just move it back and forth in an east/west direction. This ...


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In short, the movement of an ice cube in water lags relative to the movement of the container because the ice cube's viscosity is sharply higher than that of the surrounding water. The effects of inertia might be more easily imagined by simplifying the components to a slowly-melting ice cube sitting on a smooth/flat platter. If the platter is slid briskly ...


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Your assertion that spinning the glass causes the liquid in it to also spin may contain only a grain of truth and a lot of optical illusion. It is extremely difficult to see the motion of water or even just the exact position of its surface; especially with calm water, this is a frequent cause of misjudged landings for pilots of sea or amphibious planes. ...


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A quick Google will tell you the density of ice increases with decreasing temperature. For example see this data from the Engineering Toolbox. At around 72K ice undergoes a phase transition to a structure called ice-XI. I can't find density figures for ice-XI, but I think it is just an order-disorder transition and any density change is likely to be small.


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Ice cubes are colder than the water they are in, so the water freezes the two ice cubes together forming the bridge with the ice.



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