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Water is known as $H_2O$. In it's liquid state this molecules wiggles around and needs more space. Cooling water down slows this wiggling motion. After the phase transition to it's solid phase it is called ice. The solid phase features a hexagonal lattice structure caused by strong hydrogen bonds. The picture depicts red oxygen and small gray hydrogen ...


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To complete LDC3 answer, water molecules can form Hydrogen bonds that are extremely strong compared with any other intermolecular force. While in liquid state, this bonds are formed and destroyed because of the kinetic energy of the molecules; however, as the temperature drops, molecules will start to arrange themselves in such a way that the Hydrogens bonds ...


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I'm sure you have seen photographs of snowflakes up close. You will notice that there are hundreds of small crystals of ice. This is the crystal structure of ice. You don't see ice cubes with a crystal structure because they freeze too fast. The water doesn't have enough time to move into the crystal lattice when you freeze the water. This web site shows how ...


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You are mistaken. Actually, you can melt ice by applying pressure. This is why ice is so slippery, when you step on a frozen lake, you are melting the very first layer of water, and thus creating a very good instant lubricant for you to slide on. It is a common knowledge false fact, see comments. Ok, granted, at very high pressures water does become solid. ...


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Let's start with the evaporation of water (or sublimation, in this case). Carbon dioxide exists as a gas at normal temperature and pressure. If it is compressed and cooled, you make dry ice. When dry ice heats up, the solid becomes a gas directly (any liquid is from water condensing on the dry ice). This process is called sublimation. Water (or ice) can ...


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Like you say, there seems to be something odd happening here. I have seen videos of water from a domestic fridge freezer being poured from a bottle and instantly forming a mound of ice. It is very hard to believe this mound, even though looking rather slushy, only contains a few percent of ice. Is it possible that the supercooled water contains some of the ...


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John Rennie's answer is pretty good. I will only add the reason for the energy curve is the different forces between adjacent molecules. And this mean different potential energies. H2O - H2O and CO2 - CO2 are more energetically favorable than H2O - CO2 CO2 - CO2 is found in the interior of a bubble. The energy drop is proportional to the number of ...


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This isn't the definitive answer that DumpsterDoofus was hoping for since I can't point to any scientific publications - they must exist but a quick Google failed to find anything from a reputable journal though there are loads of blog articles. Anyhow, although in soda the carbon dioxide solution is supersaturated there is an energy barrier to creating a ...



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