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You are mistaken. Actually, you can melt ice by applying pressure. This is why ice is so slippery, when you step on a frozen lake, you are melting the very first layer of water, and thus creating a very good instant lubricant for you to slide on. Ok, granted, at very high pressures water does become solid. From the phase diagram, to get solid at around 0C ...


1

Let's start with the evaporation of water (or sublimation, in this case). Carbon dioxide exists as a gas at normal temperature and pressure. If it is compressed and cooled, you make dry ice. When dry ice heats up, the solid becomes a gas directly (any liquid is from water condensing on the dry ice). This process is called sublimation. Water (or ice) can ...


-1

Like you say, there seems to be something odd happening here. I have seen videos of water from a domestic fridge freezer being poured from a bottle and instantly forming a mound of ice. It is very hard to believe this mound, even though looking rather slushy, only contains a few percent of ice. Is it possible that the supercooled water contains some of the ...


2

John Rennie's answer is pretty good. I will only add the reason for the energy curve is the different forces between adjacent molecules. And this mean different potential energies. H2O - H2O and CO2 - CO2 are more energetically favorable than H2O - CO2 CO2 - CO2 is found in the interior of a bubble. The energy drop is proportional to the number of ...


7

This isn't the definitive answer that DumpsterDoofus was hoping for since I can't point to any scientific publications - they must exist but a quick Google failed to find anything from a reputable journal though there are loads of blog articles. Anyhow, although in soda the carbon dioxide solution is supersaturated there is an energy barrier to creating a ...



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