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Higher temperature will make the molecules jitter more and they tend to separate, melt at sufficiently high temperature. Increasing the pressure will counteract that separation, hence the temperature at which the material melts should increase as the pressure goes up.


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All first order phase transitions have a change of volume. With different pressures you need to consider the sign of the work $P\Delta V$ that needs to occur during the phase change. If $\Delta V$ is positive, the phase change will occur at a higher temperature for higher pressure. If negative, the phase change will occur at a lower temperature. (Note ...


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I stumbled on this question rather late - and when the link to the image in @Georg's answer was no longer working I started a little digging of my own. I came upon the following plot (at http://www1.lsbu.ac.uk/water/microwave.html) which explains this very well: It shows unambiguously that water has a strong absorption peak in the "low GHz" range (right ...


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If there's hardly any ice at all, the water will cool as the ice warms to 0°C, then cool some more as the ice melts. The cooling stops when the ice melts. If there's hardly any water at all, the water will cool to 0°C. If the ice is cooler than 0°C, that tiny bit of water will freeze. If there's an intermediate amount of water, the water will cool to 0°C ...


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Yes, your analysis is correct. Water in equilibrium with ice is at a temperature of 0 degrees C. The reason that the water doesn't spontaneously turn to ice has to do with the latent heat of fusion of water: in order for water to turn to ice at zero degrees C, you need to remove quite a lot of heat from it. In the case of water / ice, the latent heat is ...



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