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the magnet heats the metal which then melts the ice and makes it look like its glowing red hot.


4

It's really complex, and the answer from Shep is a bit imprecise. Ice at temperatures just below freezing has the remarkable property of not being frozen on the surface. There is a extremely thin layer of liquid water on the surface. How thin? 70 nm at 272 K, but only 10 nm at 262 K. This water layer can act as a lubricant, but with less lubricant the ...


6

It's only "sticky" when you stick it to something that was initially warmer than freezing. Let's say you stick your finger against a (very cold) ice cube. Two things happen in sequence: The heat from your finger transfers into the ice and melts it slightly, forming a thin water layer. The heat dissipates further into the cube, and the water refreezes. ...


5

Can this frozen form freeze further? Or can it become more solid? (for example, by exposing to colder temperatures and/or a higher pressure). Can ice freeze further by transforming into a different crystalline form? The ice will remain solid while lowering temperature or pressure but might change in state, or phase, as you mention. But you should ...


0

Because the air is cold? Melting ice requires energy, so the air in the bottle in contact with ice rapidly cools to near freezing point. For ice to keep melting the air around it must be reheated. Near the surface this happens by convection UP from the air warmed by the water surface and is comparatively efficient. In contrast, the polar air may be below ...



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