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1

As the Eiffel tower famously shows, a "good" self-supporting structure does not have a uniform section - instead, at every level the size of the supporting surface is large enough to support the weight of the structure above it without reaching a fracture / yield point of the building material. The melting point of ice is a function of pressure - so the ...


8

I don't think the question can be answered because you don't say how the orbital energy is to be dissipated. However it's quite interesting to compare the orbital energy with the energy required to boil the ice. Let's suppose our ice supplied is aboard the International Space Station, so they are at an altitude of $h$ = 300km and moving at an orbital ...


1

We would have to know more about the ice we want to build the wall with. For example, for ice in icesheets, you have an ice which effectively reaches a plastic region of the stress strain curve at around $0,5 MPa$. I am not a geologist, but I believe that the glaciers can be only thicker than $\sim 50 m$ thanks to it's specific shape and the fact that the ...


0

The ice block with the lead inside it has displaced more than the lead (individually). Let me take two cases. Case 1 when ice block and lead are in combined state, and case 2, when the ice block have been melted. So now in case1 the water displaced in combined state of ice with lead is equal to the (volume of ice + volume of lead) × density of water. ...


-2

It was due to the slight expansion of the liquid and the slight contraction of the bottle gained when in the freeze. Normally, when liquids tend to reach their lower fixed point/freezing point they tend to expand which is the opposite of solids. If the bottle was left in the freezer for some time the bottle was going to explode.



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