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5

The orbitals, which recently have been observed for the hydrogen atom, are probability distributions. These probability orbital distributions have been calculated using quantum mechanical solutions of the Schrodinger equation which give the wave function, and the square of the wave function is the probability distribution for finding the electron at that ...


3

The time-independent Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom is $$-\frac{\hbar^2}{2m}\vec \nabla^2\psi-\frac{e^2}{4\pi \epsilon_0r}\psi=E\psi $$ If your aim is just to verify that the $1s$-wave function $$\psi_{100}=\frac{1}{\sqrt{\pi a^3}}e^{-r/a}\hspace{2cm} a\equiv \frac{4\pi\epsilon_0\hbar^2}{me^2} $$ is indeed an eigenfunction, then your task ...


2

Tyson claims that an electron disappears from one orbital and appears in another and claims that this is like going from the second floor of a building to the fourth floor without existing in between. This doesn't actually happen. What happens instead is that each possible state of the system has a continuous amplitude associated with it. In a transition ...


2

Like garyp says, the electrons are not discrete particles, but rather exist as a smear (a cloud) with the most intensity of their existing in the spaces so described by the wavefunction. Now, all of the electron needs to interact at once, so when an interaction (measurement, chemical reaction, etc.) happens, the wavefunction of the electron changes as well ...


1

Usually it's not quite true that there is no regulator - typically these types of cylinders have a pressure reduction valve that doesn't look like much. There's nothing to "regulate" but they reduce the pressure from 100+ bar to something that makes sense for filling balloons. A similar thing is used in scuba diving: the "primary regulator" takes the ...


1

The gas won't ignite as long as the concentration is higher than UEL/UFL (upper explosive/flammability limit). So as long as there is no hole, you should be fine. That said, I wouldn't play with hydrogen if I can use Helium instead !


1

The picture of an electron as a little ball that moves around like a billiard ball sometimes works. But it fails enough times that one has to conclude that it's not correct. This is one of those cases when if fails. The wavefunction represents where the electron might be found if an experiment were done to find it. That's not the same as saying that the ...



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