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0

yes it would, (well if it was moving down a ramp) like you said, friction would also come to play, but it should go faster because the more weight you add the more downwards momentum and if it's moving dow a ramp then it should turn that to forward momentum.


0

Use a large and thick copper spoon. Put the spoon in the coffee for 3 seconds. Remove it and insert the spoon in your mouth. (beware it will be hot) Use the tongue and palate to cool spoon pushing hard. When the spoon is close to the temperature of your mouth (feels tepid) remove it and reinsert the spoon in the coffee by another 3 secondos plus 0.5 ...


3

Assuming you're talking about propagation through free space, the beam will be diffracted by the aperture you pass it through (3cm in this case) and that will cause the beam to diverge. The far field angular divergence, $\theta$, is approximately given by the equation for the Airy disk: $$ \sin\theta \approx 1.22 \frac{\lambda}{d} \tag{1} $$ where $d$ is ...


1

It looks good to me, that is, not invalid at all. In my opinion, what you have to do now, is (I prefer $\dot{s}$ instead of $\frac{ds}{dt}$): $$E_k = W_1 \Rightarrow \frac{m {\dot{s}}^2}{2} = -c \int \left(2w{\dot s} + {\dot s}^2 \right) \mathrm ds + gs(M -\mu m) + - csw^2$$ Taking $\frac{d}{ds}$ on both sides: $$m \dot{s} \frac{\mathrm d ...


2

There's different levels on which you can answer this question: First, because the coin is a large enough macroscopic system that quantum-mechanical effects are negligible (i.e. we don't have to worry about the wave nature of the coin). The variables that will affect the final outcome of the coin toss are all classical in nature, and so can be measured and ...


2

At the very least you would also need the dimensions of the coin (mass alone is not enough) and the elastic properties of both the coin and of the surface on which you land... that has a big impact (since the coin can bounce or "stick", depending on the surface). It may be possible to predict for certain sizes of coin and height of drop (a carefully executed ...


1

To do it completely without error would be impossible. There are simply too many parameters to be determined to exact precision in order for there to be no error. One of the answers in John's comment links to this research that provides further details.



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