Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Given that you use the tag "home-experiment" I will give an answer in that spirit. Obviously you can use the convex lens to focus the sunlight onto a piece of paper - find the distance where the paper catches fire and that is your focal length. That's how I did it when I was 4. Shoe laces too - they are really stinky when you get the distance right. Wear ...


0

That may depend on what you call "invisible". How about a system of direction-sensitive Lytro cameras all around a body and projectors transmitting whatever the cameras on the other side of the body sees in the direction opposite to the sensed one? As of today it's a mildly challenging but doable engineering project. Would such a system count?


2

In the cases of Bottle A and Bottle C, they are full and empty. So the amount of water in them (or not) can be considered to be a complete system along with the bottle, since there is no possible way in which the fluid in the full bottle would reduce its volume or overall distribution, certain properties like the system's center of mass,center of gravity and ...


0

So we have than with a mixture of water and air we have more energy dissipation? One possible reason is this: the B bottle is assymetric, with the heavy watered side down. While it turns, water shpuld turn sides. Because of the viscosity of the water nd n relation with the glass, water has to exert a work, thus losing energy


0

Here's a brief 'classical' description: In 1820, Hans Christian ├śrsted discovered that an electric current through a wire sets up a 'magnetic field' around the wire, in concentric cylinders with the wire as the axis. In its simplest form, an 'inductor' is just a piece of wire. For this reason, a DC voltage applied across an inductor is like a 'short ...


1

I have heard of educational innovations.. They have physics lab materials and projects and other interesting science stuff...there is also arbor scientific for high school-like physics projects...


-1

Air drag does not depend alone on the surface area of the object, but its value of mass/surface area.. If you can increase the surface area of the object while keeping it's mass the same, it will influence the air drag on it. But if you increase the surface area while also increasing the mass, it will go unchanged.


3

When you stretch a rubber band there is considerable deformation to the polymer molecules in the rubber. As a result some of the work you do on the rubber band goes into exciting molecular vibrations i.e. heat. Some of the work you do is stored as elastic energy and some is dissipated as heat. As the band is allowed to relax the elastic energy stored within ...


1

When you extend the rubber band, you store potential energy in it. Now when you release the rubber band this potential energy is converted into kinetic energy (the ends of the rubber band start moving). In an ideal situation the energy of the rubber band would then stay constant, (potential would convert to kinetic energy and then kinetic would convert to ...


0

yes it would, (well if it was moving down a ramp) like you said, friction would also come to play, but it should go faster because the more weight you add the more downwards momentum and if it's moving dow a ramp then it should turn that to forward momentum.


1

Use a large and thick copper spoon. Put the spoon in the coffee for 3 seconds. Remove it and insert the spoon in your mouth. (beware it will be hot) Use the tongue and palate to cool spoon pushing hard. When the spoon is close to the temperature of your mouth (feels tepid) remove it and reinsert the spoon in the coffee by another 3 secondos plus 0.5 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included