Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

First, I worry that you might confuse a singularity, which is a region (possibly pointlike) where the curvature is undefined (or infinite), versus a black hole, which is a special surface with a particular global property in an asymptotically flat spacetime. There is a famous conjecture (the cosmic censorship conjecture) that every singularity is within an ...


0

The event horizon of static black holes without charge is the same for every observer, and it is located at the Schwarzschild radius. Even for an observer falling into the black hole the event horizon is the same, but at the difference that he will not notice the presence of any event horizon when falling through it. In the meanwhile outside observers will ...


0

To take your question literally, we may speak of it because our speech is not bound by nature or reality - one walk down the 'Fiction' aisle of a bookstore will demonstrate that. We write of and speak of and theorize about many things we cannot, or will not experience (such as other multiverses, interiors of stars, etc.). Why would you think we would be ...


2

As an outcome of his PhD thesis work, Richard Feynman and John Wheeler wrote a series of papers on how the kickback on an electron as it emits a photon can be modeled accurately as the result of an "advanced photon" traveling backwards in time and striking the electron. No, the Feynman-Wheeler theory considers model of classical electromagnetic ...


0

Perhaps this almost ventures into the realm of philosophy, but the original premise oddly treats the photon differently from the electron. The only reason we think of it this way is because it is more common to observe the photon being created, since it is a boson. But quantum electrodynamics dictates that as a photon is traveling along at a great ...



Top 50 recent answers are included