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4

It should be clarified that the Higgs boson does not carry mass. The correct statement is that the Higgs field (not boson) is giving mass to some (not all) particles. In fact most of your mass is not given by the Higgs field. Most of the mass of atomic nucleus (protons and neutrons) is due to the binding energy of strong interaction. The Higgs field is ...


2

I found my answer, the Higg's Boson is predicted to have a mean lifetime of 1.56 x 10-22 s.


0

At the moment there does not exist a quantized unified theory of gravitation and the standard model. The only candidate to date is string theories which are at a research level, and in which I am not able to form an answer. There exist effective quantizations of gravity and effective models including the standard model in the studies of cosmology and the ...


-1

The essence of the Higgs mechanism is that it allows the breaking of the (gauge) symmetry to grow a mass for the gauge (vector) bosons, which are necessarily massless in the unbroken symmetry. The Higgs scalar and the two degrees of freedom of the massless vector boson combine to form the three degrees of freedom of a massive vector boson. Goldstone's ...


0

The short answer is really neither. They may actually be pulling away from both simultaneously. Read below why. That’s because the Higgs boson coming at 125 to 126 GeV has proven supersymmetry (SUSY) wrong. SUSY was precisely predicting a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, or a much lower mass than the actual one. That’s the admitted position of David ...


0

I would say (almost) yes... If you are familiar with QFT, then you probably know that the mass $m$ of a given field, say a scalar $\phi$, is introduced via the square term $\frac{m^2}{2} \phi^2$ in the Lagrangian. This however comes at the expense of some of the symmetry of the theory. In particular, if you naively apply this idea within the Standard Model, ...


1

Mitchell Porter’s answer is very interesting. However, it is also very divergent from what the movie conveyed and the current state of the SUSY vs. Multiverse debate. He uncovers an interesting paper “A Finely-Predicted Higgs Boson Mass from a Finely-Tuned Weak Scale” published in 2009 or four years before the release of the movie. This paper contradicts ...


2

A classical "shell" of charge of radius $R$ will appear to have a field, outside the shell, corresponding to the charge all being at the center of the shell. If the charge on the shell is $q$ then a charge $dq$ being pulled in from infinity will cost an energy $k_e~q~dq / R$; without loss of generality this is the same if $dq$ is spread over an infinitely ...


5

The mass of a fundamental particle turns out to be quite an elusive concept, because massless particles act as a source of gravity and they carry momentum. What then is special about mass? Where mass comes in is in explaining the relationship between the total energy of a particle and its momentum. For any particle we have the expression for the total ...


1

The scalar potential of your theory is $$V(\phi) = \lambda (\phi^a \phi^a - v^2)^2,$$ where I suspect you meant to take the square as I've written here. This potential is minimized when $\sqrt{\phi^a \phi^a} = v$. Think of $\phi=\frac{1}{2} \phi^a \sigma^a$ as a vector with components $\phi^a$ in a 3-dimensional vector space with basis vectors $\sigma_a/2$. ...


11

In principle, yes. You can reverse any decay process and the corresponding synthesis will be valid - in this case, since $H_0\to\gamma\gamma$ happens, then $\gamma\gamma\to H_0$ will also happen, assuming the kinematics work out. However, the corresponding probability is very small. Out of all the possible things that could happen when two photons cross ...



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