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First, note that there is no unified theory of QFT and gravity, so talking about geodesics and about the Higgs is really not possible within the framework of our current theories. Nevertheless, the confusion here seems to stem somehow from the idea that all particles are "initally" massless, and "then" the Higgs comes along and gives them mass. This idea of ...


2

A look at the wikipedia article will clear up confusions in your question. In the standard model, at temperatures high enough that electroweak symmetry is unbroken, all elementary particles are massless. At a critical temperature the Higgs field becomes tachyonic, the symmetry is spontaneously broken by condensation, and the W and Z bosons acquire ...


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Perhaps you could develop a mathematical therory following your lines of thouhght, but for current theories, the higgs is another field, different that the field of the particles to wich it gives them mass. The do not actually give them mass, but the interactions with them "looks like" mass for any macroscopic practical uses.


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A field and a particle are two different concepts and it is well that one should separate them. A field can be classified as a scalar field, a vector field, a spinor field or a tensor field according to whether the value of the field at each point is a scalar, a vector, a spinor or a tensor, respectively. For example, the Newtonian gravitational field is ...


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The Higgs Field is believed to permeate the universe, and the Higgs Boson is just an excitation of one of the four components the Higgs Field! The Higgs field needs high amounts of energy to be excited, so when Higgs Boson is "created", its energy level is usually many orders of magnitude higher than the ground energy level of its surroundings, and hence the ...


1

I don't think a big effect like the one in the game is possible, but a small effect is possible... The mass of a proton plus an electron is greater than the mass of a hydrogen atom (by a little tiny bit) because $E=mc^2$, where $m$ is the inertial mass. The energy of the electron and proton in a hydrogen atom is lower than the energy of the hydrogen atom ...


4

First of all, I'd like to make some remarks: The spectrum of a 2HDM (two-Higgs doublet model) is more complex than you think. There are 2 CP-even bosons ($h$, $H$), a charged scalar ($H^\pm$) and a CP-odd scalar ($A^0$). Usually, we identify the lightest CP-even boson as the scalar particle found at the LHC in 2012 and we assume that the other scalars are ...


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Your guess goes into the correct direction. There are other particles contributing to $h \to \gamma \gamma$, such as $W^\pm$ bosons. Moreover, these exact branching fractions depend on the parameters of the model. While a scenario with no coupling between the scalar at 125 GeV and the top looks very disfavored, the same model with different parameters ...


3

I have not seen the film. But this was not "supersymmetry versus multiverse". It was "supersymmetry without multiverse" versus "supersymmetry with multiverse". According to quantum field theory, a light Higgs boson (light compared to "grand unification" energies) should still look heavy because of virtual particle effects, unless these effects mostly ...


2

Particle physics up to now has come up with the Standard Model as a mathematical theory that fitted most experimental data up to the LHC and was successful in predicting the results of experiments, including many analysis of LHC data. The standard model has one Higgs, that became necessary because just the groups structure that the data implied ( ...


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Question 1. "What does it mean for a field to be excited?" It means to be in something other than the quantum ground state. Modern physics conceives of the universe as being made of a handful of quantum fields. Space and time aren't just filled with quantum fields, they themselves are made of quantum fields. "Empty space" is simply a shorthand for what ...



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