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Leptons and quarks are fermions. ( Fermions are particles with half integer spins.) You can, like the author has, divide them into three generations on basis of their masses. The Higgs boson is a boson. (Bosons are particles with integer spins.) The Higgs boson (which happens to be electrically neutral) is part of a completely different category of ...


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All these links are accessible at a non-mathematical level, and they are by recognized scientists (with the exception of the first link). (1) To start, see the "Simple English Wikipedia", which explains what the Higgs effect is, and the reason for the Higgs effect: http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_field. (2) The difference between the Higgs boson and ...


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For anyone interested, I found a good document with all Feynman rules and different notations: http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6213


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First of all, the oblique parameters S,T and U are defined to be zero within the Standard Model (SM). This means, that the SM is a reference and therefore, these parameters are indications for physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). They account for corrections in the vacuum polarizations of the EW gauge bosons and are chosen in a way, that different BSM ...


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To add to the previous answers. Particles such as the Higgs field and the quarks are, in the modern theory, understood as excitations/waves/perturbations of the underlying quantum fields. The fields permeate the whole of space and time and the way they interact with each other determines the physics of the universe. Arguably, the fields are more ...


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No, the law of conservation of momentum definitely applies to photons. The modification is that the momentum of a lightlike particle is constrained to be equal to its energy divided by $c$. Therefore, for photons, where $E = h f$, then the momentum is equal to $p = \frac{h f}{c}$


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I suspect you have misunderstood what is meant by the term field in relation to the Higgs boson. You say: an electron creates a radial electric field but in no way it can interact with the field it created and you are quite correct that the electron creates an electrostatic field around it. However in this context the term field refers to a quantum ...


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Take an Abelian example. The $U(1)$ gauge invariant kinetic term of the photon is given by $$\mathscr{L}=-\frac{1}{4}F_{\mu \nu}F^{\mu \nu}$$ Where $$F_{\mu \nu} = \partial_{\mu}A_{\nu}-\partial_{\nu}A_{\mu}.$$ That is $\mathscr{L}$ is invariant under the transformation: $A_{\mu}(x) \rightarrow A_{\mu}(x)-\partial_{\mu} \eta(x)$ for any $\eta$ and $x$. If ...


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Mass comes from things other than the Higgs field--the latter is just the main contributor. What gives the Higgs boson its mass is still up for debate--for a more detailed discussion, see the following post: How does the Higgs Boson gain mass itself?


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Yes, that is the Higgs potential of the Standard Model. Note that a $\phi^3$ term is forbidden by symmetry (it would not be an $\mathrm{SU}(2)$ scalar), and $\mathcal{O}(\phi^5)$ terms would be non-renormalizable, so this is really the only potential we can write down that does not need other new physics.


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An experimentalist's answer to: What is the difference between the Higgs Boson particle and an electron moving through the Higgs field? Our experiments found a large number of resonances and particles which fitted beautifully into SU(3) representations, separated by their quantum numbers and occupying unique niches in the representations. The ...



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