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-3

Another factor here: We build these huge atom smashers because we want a look at things that are normally sealed inside larger particles. The energy is to shatter the box they're in.


87

Isn't the universe full of Higgs bosons, making up the Higgs field? No. In particle physics, it is understood that the underlying (more fundamental) object is the field, not the particles. Particles are excitations of the fields that can be measured, and always carry certain properties like charge, mass, spin etc. The field that you are most familiar ...


3

Ad 1) Yes and no. There are certainly Higgsbosons in the Universe. Everything we can create at the LHC is created in other events too. Cosmic rays can have more energy than the LHC beam, so there will be Higgs bosons for sure, just as an example. The problem is to bring such a sophisticated detector in place, in addition you don't really have the experiment ...


1

I think it's impossible, because you'd break electromagnetism if the spectrum had a single neutral Higgs in a 2HDM. I presume both doublets obtain VEVs such that 8 real dof are supposed to be reduced to 5 dof after EWSB, with 3 dof eaten by massive gauge bosons. But if the Higgs doublets have a single neutral component, one of the charged ones must be ...


2

What I have retained from lectures on symmetry breaking is that when trying to write a unified Lagrangian for weak and electromagnetic interactions, one is faced with the fact that the electromagnetic interaction has infinite range and thus can exchange a zero mass particle, the photon, the weak, because it experimentally has a small range , must have ...



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