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82

This is really a footnote to Adobe's answer. Light cannot escape from an event horizon. But how can you check that light can never escape? You can watch the surface for some time $T$, but all you have proved is that light can't escape in the time $T$. This is what we mean by an apparent horizon, i.e. it is a surface from which light can't escape within a ...


17

There are a number of equivalent ways to think about Hawking radiation. One is pair creation, as endolith mentions, where the infalling particle has negative total energy and so reduces the mass of the black hole. Another way, perhaps more useful here, involves Compton wavelength. If the wavelength of a particle (not just photons, by the way) is greater than ...


13

A few things: 1)Just because an observer crossing the event horizon doesn't necessarily feel ill effects AT THE TIME OF CROSSING the horizon, it doesn't mean that they won't inevitably end up at the singularity, where there will be plenty of ill effects--all timelike curves that cross the horizon end up at the singularity in a finite amount of proper time. ...


10

There are two ways to approach your question. The first is to explain what Brian Greene means, and the second is to point out that the "particles being swallowed" explanation is a metaphor and isn't actually how the calculation is done. I'll attempt both, but I'm outside my comfort zone so if others can expand or correct what follows please jump in! When a ...


8

Craig Feinstein asked: Does Stephen Hawking believe that General Relativity is wrong? Here is my answer (I will shift my answer there if some one reopen that question): Stephen Hawking did NOT say that black holes do not exist. Hawking used to think balckholes are oblivious. Now he admits (like some other people do) balckholes have perfect memory , just ...


7

Hawking radiation is a very robust prediction. It comes simply from applying quantum field theory in the curved space-time near the event horizon. It's also part of the synthesis called "black hole thermodynamics", for which string theory provides an explanation in terms of the statistical mechanics of microstates. In the S-matrix of quantum gravity, if ...


7

The conditions for the existence of the Hawking effect are described in classical terms, i.e you need 1) A Lorentz signature metric 2) A horizon (given, for example, by space flowing into a BH faster than the speed of light, or fluid flowing downstream faster than the speed of sound) 3) Surface gravity at the horizon Those conditions are then applied to ...


6

Radiation normally contains subtle correlations. For all practical purposes you can't use it, but it's there. Hawking radiation is, according to the theory, perfectly thermal and does not contain any more information than the temperature itself. The problem is that then the process of black hole evaporation is not reversible, in principle. Unlike all other ...


6

Such a process is forbidden by energy conservation: the proton is the lightest baryon (that is the lightest bound state of three quarks). hawking radiation finds it's energy by reducing the energy of the black hole, but there is not lighter baryon state for the proton to go to. Baryon number violating proton decay processes are theorized, but have not been ...


5

We are already living in a nearly empty de Sitter space - the cosmological constant already represents 73% of the energy density in the Universe - and the Universe won't experience any qualitative change in the future: the percentage will just approach 100%. However, once the space may be approximated as an empty de Sitter space, all moments of time are ...


5

Q1 - The black hole spacetime sees actual particles in the "static" frame because the diminishing curvature across the black hole spacetime continuously connects the static frame at infinity - which is really static and corresponds to freely falling, static observers - with the static observers who otherwise live in a strong gravitational field near the ...


5

There's a topology change in the spacetime when you complete the $M\rightarrow 0$ limit--The Minkowski spacetime is non-singular, while the Schwarzschild spacetime contains a spacetime singularity for any (positive) value of $M$. You could also look at it in terms of the total energy available for a small mass BH is going to be miniscule, and you would ...


5

Actually working out a rigorous prediction for Hawking radiation, you need to solve the equations for the relevant QFT semi-classically--treating the metric of spacetime as a substitute for the Minkowski metric usually used in QFT. This is similar to deriving the quantum mechanics of the Hydrogen atom without paying attention to the fact that photons exist ...


5

I assume you're asking how a black hole can evaporate due to Hawking radiation. The answer is that the Hawking radiation does not come from the event horizon, but instead comes from a region just outside the event horizon so time has not stopped at its position. If you were to watch a black hole form then evaporate, you would never see an event horizon ...


5

I'm kind of in your boat. Hawking radiation violates almost all of the energy conditions, and a stacked set of apparent horizons is two-way transversible when their area decreases with time. I see no reason why the typical assumptions like cosmic censorship should apply. And if cosmic censorship is gone, and the black hole is two-way transversible, then ...


5

You do not state the level of understanding you have in physics. Negative mass is a mathematical construct necessary to explain Hawking radiation, and is due to what are called virtual particles. These are lines in Feynman diagrams which diagrams are a shorthand in generating the integrals necessary for the calculation of crossections and lifetimes in ...


4

Also, the book mentions that a negative-energy particle would appear to an observer inside the black hole as positive. Why? Very roughly speaking and in as simple terms as possible, inside the black hole, gravity is so intense that the time coordinate and one of the spatial coordinates (the radial coordinate) swap "roles". That's one way to see why ...


4

As you said, the case of black holes is conceptually totally analogous to the burning books. In principle, the process is reversible, but the probability of the CPT-conjugated process (more accurate a symmetry than just time reversal) is different from the original one because $$ \frac{Prob(A\to B)}{Prob(B^{CPT}\to A^{CPT})} \approx \exp(S_B-S_A ).$$ This is ...


4

I don't have a full answer to your question, but your question did make me realize that the Hawking radiation must be carrying away angular momentum from a rotating Kerr black hole. If it only carried away energy (mass) the Kerr black hole would become extremal as it lost mass but kept the same angular momentum. This, I think, proves that there has to be ...


4

I think your main question is how to reconcile the infinite time-to-reach-horizon needed for a particle created just outside the horizon with the fact that virtual pairs only exist for a short time before re-annihilation? As you've correctly pointed out, the virtual pair picture is only a heuristic (as Hawking said in his original paper), a more ...


4

Physicists are tasked to construct models of reality that are internally consistent and that have predictive power. Working on black holes and Hawking radiation fits this bill. The growing theoretical framework on black hole thermodynamics is absolutely essential to eliminate any internal inconsistencies that seemed to affect thermodynamics when applied to ...


4

This question involves the concept of "virtual particle" which was discussed a few days ago here. In a nutshell, a particle is virtual when it is a connecting line in a Feynman diagram between two vertices. It has all the quantum numbers of its name ( photon, electron, etc.) but not the mass, which is the measure of the four vector describing it. In that ...


4

First of all, in lower dimensions (2+1 and 1+1) the gravity is much simpler. This is because in 3d curvature tensor is completely defined by Ricci tensor (and metric at a given point) while in 2d curvature tensor is completely defined by scalar curvature. This means that there are no purely gravitational dynamical degrees of freedom, in particular no ...


4

Imagine how a black hole is formed. According to the most prevalent theory most black holes start out as supermassive stars - Much larger then our sun. As they run out of fuel to support their own weight they go through a series of implosions. The shock waves from those implosions throw off the outer shells of material into space while the core collapses ...


4

It is not a matter of opinions, it may be calculated. The Hawking radiation inevitably shrinks primarily the black hole mass (it may also change the angular momentum and charges but they are being reduced "proportionally" to the mass in the limit of many Hawking quanta). Lighter black holes carry a smaller entropy. The reduction of the black hole entropy ...


4

The supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies have evaporation times much, much larger than the age of the universe. They're not going anywhere. But, even if they hypothetically vanished, mature galaxies would barely be affected. It's not quite accurate to say that these holes are the "source of energy" for the galaxy. The stars in the galaxy ...


3

First of all I do not think that conservation of information is an established statement. It seems to be an open problem still as far as black holes go. Even if true, it is a different type of conservation, analogous to the unitarity requirements of a system of functions or phase space considerations. From the conclusions of a paper by Hawking : In ...


3

It is simply not true that a non-vanishing stress tensor is incompatible with asymptotic flatness. The Schwarzschild spacetime is asymptotically flat, period. The semiclassical Hawking-calculation does not in any way change this background, unless you consider effects from backreactions. Once you take into account backreactions the Hawking radiation does ...



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