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1

The answer lies in the fact that, in graphene, there is an effective long range interaction mediated by the inverse biharmonic operator (which in 2D goes as $x^2\ln(x)$ and is extremely long-ranged) coupling the gaussian curvature at any two points on the sheet. Due to this, any static ripples or thermally produced dynamic ripples interact at arbitrary ...


1

In order to appreciate the periodicity of graphene one has to recognize that it consists out of two interpenetrating hexagonal Bravais sublattices, A and B, which together make up the honeycomb lattice. The two sublattices are like two degrees of freedom, and the electron can have an amplitude to be on sublattice A, and an amplitude to be on the sublattice ...


14

Graphene is only transparent because it is very thin (one atom thick). If it absorbs 2% per layer then just a few hundred layers would absorb almost all light and that would still be a very thin sheet of graphite. The question should be why does graphene absorb so much light compared to diamond which really is transparent? A simplified answer is that ...


3

I assume the biggest factor is the thickness. Graphene is a layer of carbon one atom thick. Light is absorbed/reflected by the top layers of a material and if you make any material into a layer one atom thick you'll find it increases transparency a lot. The thing that is special about graphene is that it forms bonds in a 2D layer where most materials ...


0

What makes Graphene so strong is its electrostatic forces resulting from delocalized electrons flowing through positively charged carbon atoms. This diffrence in charge creates a strong electrostatic attraction that holds Graphene together. This phenomenon also explains why it is such a strong conductor.


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This is actually exactly the same question I was asking myself a while ago, and it took me quite some time to figure it out. What I ended up doing was: diagonalise the BdG Hamiltonian in Mathematica solve the expressions for the eigenvalues for $\kappa$ neglect terms proportional to $\kappa^2$, $\kappa \Delta$ in the expressions for the eigenvectors, ...


0

The hexagonal Graphene lattice can be considered as a superposition of two identical sub-lattices set off by one one carbon-carbon bond length. As a result, it has two sets of wavevectors k,that are picked out by the lattice, inequivalent (since the two sublattices really are distinct) but otherwise identical (since it's semantics to say which sublattice is ...



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