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4

It can't fall slower as the first cosmical speed (7.8 km/s), which is still very high. Although it would cause much smaller destruction as it would hit directly with the mean speed of the meteors (10-70km/s). The lower angle of the hit doesn't play a significant role, because considering its mass, the interaction with the atmosphere will be probably ...


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Short answer: the changing composition between silicate-rich mantle and iron-rich core means the melting temperature does not increase sufficiently for the iron/nickel outer core to remain solid. The ability of something to solidify is a competition between the potential energy associated with the atoms that would occupy a solid lattice versus the thermal ...


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This is an interesting question and one that probably needs detailed simulation to settle. But one can make the following broad prediction: the shape of the meteorite would have minimal effect on the outcome, for the following reasons: At the kinds energies let slip in the moments of impact and the kinds of pressures and temperatures that prevail, all ...


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Slight radioactivity inside the earth continues to produce heat - and given the size of the earth, this heat cannot easily get out. As a result, the deeper parts of the earth are very, very hot (think volcanoes) - and most phase diagrams will tell you that at sufficiently high temperatures, most things are liquid. Entropy favors it.


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The Earth has a liquid outer core, a solid mantle exterior to that, and a solid core interior to it! So that’s how come the Earth has the heaviest, densest elements at its core, and how we know its outer core is a liquid layer. Like all elements, whether iron is solid, liquid, gas or “other” depends on both the pressure and temperature of the iron. Iron, ...


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Simple answers like "pressure keeps substances in solid state" are gross simplifications. If you look at any scientific source, a phase diagram often shows $p$ and $T$ (pressure and temperature) on the axes. This is because at different temperatures but at equal pressures, substances can have different states and vice versa for different pressures and ...


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The effect is noticeable even here on Earth, and in fact it has been used to measure the mean density of the Earth in experiments such as the Schiehallion experiment. The principle is simple: take a pendulum. If there is no large-mass object nearby (such as a mountain), it will hang straight downward, pointing to the center of the planet. But if there is a ...



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