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Why has Earth's core not become solid? Will this happen in the foreseeable future? TL;DR answers: Why has Earth's core not become solid? A lot of residual heat from the Earth's formation remains inside the Earth. Heat is released as iron and nickel freeze onto the solid inner core, which slows this freezing process down. The Earth is big. Moon and ...


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What is the temperature of the clear night sky from the surface of Earth? It's much closer to 273 K than 2.73 K. The answer depends on the surface temperature, the humidity, the temperature gradient through the atmosphere, and what exactly you mean by "the temperature of the clear night sky". The Swinbank formula provides an ad hoc expression for the ...


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Terrific question. You had it right in your first sentence: “the same amount of energy must have been released during the Earth's history,” but then it gets a little mixed up when you look at various energies, some of which aren’t related to the question at hand (for example, the current internal energy contributes positive mass-energy to the Earth, rather ...


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The rest of the energy went into space. Without that energy loss the planet would not even have condensed and the gas/dust cloud would have stayed a cloud. Having said that, the details of these condensation processes in planetary clouds seem to be non-trivial and, from what I have read, are not fully understood, as of yet.


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A friend of mine once overheard a conversation between a father and his child on a public transit bus on a windy day. Child: "Why does the wind blow?". Father: "Some places are cold and some places are warm. That is not fair. Thus, the wind takes the cold air away and moves it to the warm place so that everybody's happy." - IRO-bot, from Earth Science ...


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I know that 'Blowing air is called Wind' but what I don't know is, how is wind formed? And I don't want the answer from Google Search. I want to know more about wind in atomic or molecular level It is not out of a quirk of physicists that even though we have an enormous knowledge of how the microscopic framework of atoms and molecules works, we still ...


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When a region heats, and another region somewhere cools it creates a difference in pressure. Hot air rises, and it then goes towards the region of low pressure to equal the pressure at both regions. Now, why does the air rise? I mean, why hot air rises. A simple explanation is: Hot air is less dense and experiences a buoyant force, just like a bubble of ...


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Basicaly, atmospheric wind are created from pressure differences from one area respective to another, so air molecule are pushed toward the lower pressure zone. This air molecules movement is called "wind". One application of this simple principle can be described by the so called Venturi effect derived from Berbouilli's equation $$ P*_\text {1} + ...



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