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4

My simple answer to this is that high and low tides are a bit arbitrary; they're the turning points of a continuous function over time. At the places you've mentioned, the (usually most significant) bi-daily tidal harmonic is "swamped out" by the (usually less significant) daily harmonic. It's still there – it's almost certainly non zero, but it's just not ...


21

The tides are a result of the response of the Earth's oceans to the tidal forces exerted on the water by the Moon and the Sun. The responses are vastly complicated by the Earth's rotation about its axis, by the physical geography of the Earth, and by the nature of the orbits of these bodies. Of key interest with regard to this question are the inclination of ...


10

OK, here's a theory: It's all (when I say all I mean mostly) got to do with the fact that the moon's plane of revolution is inclined about 20 degrees or so relative to the earth's equator. That causes differences in the frequency of tides in various latitudes. In order to see how that happens, here's a simplified example: Draw a cross, so that you have 4 ...


0

I'm no expert on this, and the detail of tides is complex, but basically the situation is a =s follows. The moon (and sun to a lesser extent) provide a gravitational forcing with a period of just over 12 hours. Then the resultant ocean movement interacts with the local sea floor geography, which modifies the response. In most places the result is the ...


0

I agree with Lubos Motl's answer. Geologist indeed consider the magnetic property of molten iron i.e. paramagnetism and ferromagnetism. Iron is a ferromagnetic material. It has a greater degree of magnetism when compared to dia- or paramagnetic material. Now, there is a temperature called Curie's temperature when a ferromagnetic material changes to a ...


4

Dynamo Effect : The dynamo effect is a geophysical theory that explains the origin of the Earth's main magnetic field in terms of a self-exciting (or self-sustaining) dynamo. In this dynamo mechanism, fluid motion in the Earth's outer core moves conducting material (liquid iron) across an already existing, weak magnetic field and generates an ...


1

The magma has temperature between 700 and 1300 Celsius degrees. The Curie temperature of iron is at 770 degrees Celsius. Above that temperature, iron loses magnetism. Note that right above 770 °C, iron is still solid because the melting point is around 1500 °C. So magma almost never can be magnetic because it's just too hot for that. Incidentally, if it ...


0

Another way is to use fluctuations caused by solar flare coronal masses impacting on the Earth's magnetosphere, which give rise to magnetic storms. These can induce large currents in long conductors such as power grids. However, they are far more destructive than useful. On a more practical note, if you could turn the magnetic field of the Earth into ...


0

It is by simply erosion. The higher the water velocity impacts the surface, the faster the erosion or, if by drips, the longer time span it will require. High pressure water jets will erode rock very quickly while drips of water can take eons. But the process is the same. By erosion.



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