Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Under the assumptions of linear wave theory, there is no net transport of mass, but there is a net transport or energy and momentum. Because you are asking about sea waves, I believe these are appropriate assumptions for your question. For example, it would be the sort of analysis to perform to estimate the horizontal forces a wave train (e.g. tsunami) would ...


6

There has to be a few assumptions. Let's assume we are talking about a linear plane wave in relatively deep water. Because the the case where the bottom comes into play the upward hydrostatic force distorts the wave. Picking deep water or insuring the relative depth of d to L (d is average water depth and L is the wavelength of the wave) is $d/L > ...


0

Since it's the momentum of the wave that you are after, here's a good way to estimate its mass: On the open ocean: Waves are approximately sinusoidal in shape. Take a trough - the lowest point for a wave - as the base. Estimate the height of the wave and perform an integral to estimate the cross-sectional area of a wave. Then multiply this by the ...


0

Most of the energy of a tsunami wave is gravitational energy. It is the rise in sea level, and the retreat of the surge, which is most devastating. Our cities are vulnerable because we build right to the edge of the sea. If we left a reasonable buffer of tidal flats, marshes, or sand berms between ourselves and the ocean, the energy of tsunami or storm ...


0

There is a precession of the earth's axis of rotation -evidenced by astronomical observation- that is most easily explained by Newton's laws and a non-spherical earth. @Ross Milikan suggested in a comment that this was not an answer because precession only shows that the moments about the principle axes are unequal - and this could be caused by a ...


0

The subsolar point is the point on the earth's surface where the sun is directly overhead. The formula you give uses the longitude of this. Take the difference of this from the longitude for the poles of whichever geomagnetic reference model you are using.


1

Earth's magnetic field isn't really a dipole, but a dynamic field due to the convection occurring in the planet's core (consists of molten iron). The model below shows a simulation of the magnetic field (blue is pointing towards the core while yellow points away), the cluster of curves in the middle is the planet's core. The geomagnetic pole is the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included