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3

Here's an interesting thought experiment. Imagine you have an elevator shaft to the centre of the Earth which, for some strange reason, doesn't affect the gravitational field of the Earth and doesn't flood with magma. OK, now at the Earth's surface get a bottle, half full with oil and half full with water. The water is denser than the oil, so the force ...


1

I will try to make a very approximate answer for your mother (as requested), assuming the Earth spherical, and several other approximations. I am no expert in geophysics, or stellar physics. and if you want details or greater accuracy, I suggest you look at other answers, such as that of David Hammen and others. About gravity First regarding gravity. Is ...


0

Take a glass of water and two small balls, same size, one of iron and one of aluminum. Both will reach the bottom finally, but because of buoyancy the iron will settle first. The Earth was discovered to have a solid inner core distinct from its liquid outer core in 1936, ..... It is believed to consist primarily of an iron–nickel alloy and to be ...


21

Forget about force. Force is a bit much irrelevant here. The answer to this question lies in energy, thermodynamics, pressure, temperature, chemistry, and stellar physics. Potential energy and force go hand in hand. The gravitational force at some point inside the Earth is the rate at which gravitational potential energy changes with respect to distance. ...


11

There are two different quantities here to distinguish: the gravitational force and the gravitational well. At the center of the Earth, the gravitational force is zero, but the gravitational well is at its deepest. The heavy elements tend to migrate to the lowest point in the gravitational well, so they are at the center, even though the force is zero there. ...


-2

I'm just 14, and I will try to answer the question based upon my understanding. First of all, gravity, being a force and thus a vector, would cancel out in the core, as it not only depends upon the magnitude of the relative force but also the direction of it i.e. a vector going upward would cancel out with a vector going downward, and so on. But..... If we ...



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