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2

The important point here is that there is no thermodynamic limit for gravitating systems, and thus there is no well-defined temperature. This is, perhaps, not a completely intuitive result, but it comes from work on the stability of matter. This is not as glamorous as it sounds, but revolves around the need to show that the energy of matter is an extensive ...


6

A typical velocity dispersion in a globular cluster is 10 km/s. For a typical 1 solar mass subgiant in an old globular, then equating the kinetic energy to $3kT/2$, we get $T = 5\times 10^{60}$ K. Doesn't seem that helpful really... The concept of temperature is only ever applied in a relative sense - i.e. some component is hotter than another. Can't say ...


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Temperature is not useful concept for describing clusters of stars or other gravitational systems, because such systems are not in the realm described by thermodynamics. There is no way to set up thermodynamic equilibrium - globular clusters partly evaporate and core implodes. Also the velocity distribution can't be Maxwell-Boltzmannian, because very fast ...


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Interstellar space is an excellent vacuum, but it's not a perfect vacuum. For example Earth is constantly bombarded with protons from the solar wind, which stream outward uninterrupted until the heliopause when matter from other stars becomes more dominant. If there were, say, an antimatter star nearby, the place where its stellar wind of antiparticles met ...


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That's a very confusing paragraph. They use the term 'octave' specifically for a doubling of distance (r) --- that's not important. The argument is simply that the force per star falls off as $r^{-2}$, but the number of stars actually increases as $r^3$. So as you increase distance, the gravity increases by $r$. We could write this more precisely as for ...


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Okay the notion that the sky would be 100 times brighter because there are 100 more stars within a cubic parsec is ludicrous. First it would discount the 100x 100 more stars that would lie within the next parsecs distance from us. More importantly it discounts the far closer proximity of the stars within our Parsec. With 100 stars within our particular ...



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