New answers tagged

-1

Personally think the donut geometry is flawed. An egg shaped geometry would be better suited, as energy naturally wants to vortex (convection) with the differences in temperature. HOT down a central vortex and cool on the outer edge. Hot expanding to cool and cool contracting to heat. Plus with no centre point of focus in the donut, it does not mimic the ...


3

You may have things a bit mixed up. Plasma is not something that plays a role in fusion as if it were a tool or an instrument for its achievement. It is instead the only possible medium where nuclear fusion can occur: very basically, high enough temperature for protons to overcome the Coulomb repulsion, and high enough density for increased chances of ...


1

At the temperatures required for fusion reactions, matter can only exist in the plasma state. That's rather inconvenient for designers of fusion reactors, since plasma is hard to control and contain. And that's why the claims about cold-fusion were so appealing. Cold fusion promised to provide fusion power without the hassle of dealing with high temperature ...


1

Since the question has not been closed, here are a few references on the subject that exist on the net. Of course a nuclear physics course is a prerequisite for serious physics studies. http://ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/sts152_02/handout02.pdf http://www.abomb1.org/nuketech/ this has many more references inside. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included