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Yes, the question is theoretical and so the response. Under enough pressure water will become a solid, regardless of temperature. That is, as far as it is still water. If pressure is high enough, the atoms will collapse and form neutron-degenerate matter (theorized to exist in the cores of neutron stars). I am not sure if there could be an intermediate mixed ...


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I think that whatever answer is provided, is hypothetical and untestable. So I answer: No, a supernova is too large a phenomenon to affect. Yes, if we can find the appropriate "seed". For example, huge storm clouds can be triggered to rain, by seeding the cloud with silver nitrate crystals, dumping their content to the ground. Do I think humankind can ...


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Any method that turns off the core will work (again, if the star is massive enough), the collapse and bouncing back of the shell will do the rest. For instance, suck up the core to the outside (of course we are no near to have that technology yet). Or alternatively, you can pump in antimatter to the core instead (protected in magnetic vessel/pipe so it ...


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Yes, about 96% of the energy released by fusion in the Sun is due to the proton-proton cycle. The first step of this cycle is p-p fusion. The energy required to bring two protons into contact with each other is about 600 keV (Calculate the potential energy of a system of two protons with a center-to-center separation of about 2.4 fm.) As quick estimate of ...


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I think I caught that show on the science channel too and I think they represented that particular point poorly. First, I'm quite sure the sun already has a healthy amount of iron in it already, because all the inner planets do. There's no logical reason why the sun wouldn't. Iron is reasonably plentiful in the universe. What happens when a star's ...


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I will answer 3) as seen in this encyclopedic entry: Practical efforts to harness fusion energy involve two basic approaches to containing a high-temperature plasma of elements that undergo nuclear fusion reactions: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement. A much less likely but nevertheless interesting approach is based on fusion catalyzed by ...



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