New answers tagged

1

Eddy currents. Conductors resist changes in magnetic field. This is the basis of the magnet-in-copper-pipe demo. When the conductive metal encroaches on the plasma ball it encounters the ball's (spheromak's) magnetic field. The eddy current effect pushes back on the metal and pushes inward on the plasma, compressing and adiabatically heating it. The plasma'...


0

In this context (as in many other contexts) the mass of a nucleus is incorrectly but very commonly also called its "weight". This is not precise, but in many cases you can just let it slide... In this case, however, the answer to your question has not so much to do with the mass of the nucleus than with the nuclear binding energy of the nuclei. The nuclear ...


0

The study of quantum mechanics has taught us that asking questions about things that "really" happen even though they can't be observed is a recipe for making nonsensical or physically meaningless statements. Physics, like all healthy sciences, is an attempt to describe things that can (at least in principle) be observed. Numerous valid general-...


5

The ash is removed by the divertor. Since everything in the ring is ionised you can selectively remove ions with a magnetic field using their charge to mas ratio. This is done by the divertor, which pulls out heavier ions while leaving the tritium and deuterium in the ring. As for fuelling, that's basically easy as you don't need to inject much fuel since ...


0

I'm failing to understand why helium is anomalous on the binding energy curve. I know it includes concepts such as pairing, shell correction, and the liquid drop model. However, these were simply stated by my professor. He didn't explain any of them. The mass of a nucleus is always less than the sum of the individual masses of the nucleons(n,p..) which ...



Top 50 recent answers are included