Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

We need to have: $$P_{fusion}>P_{loss}$$ To do so, we begin by defining a new quantity $\tau$ , called the confinement time, which measures the rate at which a system loses energy to its environment. It is the energy density W (energy content per unit volume) divided by the power loss density $P_{loss}$ (rate of energy loss per unit volume): ...


0

For what it's worth (I cannot verify the claims): http://www.j.sinap.ac.cn/nst/EN/article/downloadArticleFile.do?attachType=PDF&id=448 (NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUES 25, 020201 (2014) - I guess this is a Chinese journal). Abstract: "Considering the mixture after muon-catalyzed fusion ($\mu$CF) reaction as overdense plasma, we analyze muon motion in the ...


0

In hydrodynamics shocks are caused by steep changes in pressure over short periods of time. In ICF in general, pressure is applied during ablation (the reaction force you mention). This ablation pressure is related to the driver (e.g., laser intensity). For example, in direct-drive ICF, the ablation pressure scales as $I^{2/3}$, where $I$ is the laser ...


1

Could anyone explain why the D+T inside the pellet is in two distinct regions? I assume you mean why is it in both vapor form (in the center) and solid (ice) form (layered in the shell). This is coupled to your second question regarding the lower density in the center. The general idea underlying ICF is to set up a hot-spot in the center of the ...


1

Is there a canned solution to this? (I don’t think so) No, probably not. There are very few cases in which there is an analytic solution for the Navier-Stokes equations. For pretty much all cases, you have to do it numerically. Which situation do you model? (Steady State) This is only a guess, but probably once the air has filled the sphere, you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included