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I am addressing this part of the question: Also why do only neutrons show fission/fusion and why can't electrons preform fission/fusion? Nuclei with a large number of neutrons are unstable . It so happens for some of them that an extra neutron in a specific low energy range can be caught when impinging on that nucleus , but the resultant new isotope ...


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There is a lighter nuclide which undergoes fission: $^8Be$. It fissions to two $^4He$ nuclei ($\alpha $ particles) with a lifetime on the order of $10^{-17}$ s. The binding energy per nucleon is much less for the beryllium than for the two $\alpha$s. It's important to note that $^8Be$ is an important link in the triple-alpha fusion process in older stars ...


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The important argument for this discussion is the Bethe Weizs├Ącker formula, which describes the binding energy of nuclei. I will try to give a cursory overview of the most important aspects. Not only heavy elements show fission and fusion. All elements up to iron-56 (one of the nuclei with the highest binding energy per nucleon) can create energy in ...


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I'm not entirely sure what you mean about 'pulling hydrogen', all bodies, whether they be planets or literally human bodies, will pull hydrogen via gravity. Earth can lose the H it attracts as H is so light that it can have speeds greater than the escape velocity (just due to random thermal motion). Perhaps Jupiter is sufficiently massive that this happens ...


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Jupiter will never (not on any timescale like the lifetime of the Sun anyway) accrete enough mass to begin hydrogen fusion. It would need to accrete 12 times its current mass to undergo a brief period of fusing its interior deuterium and to accrete more than 70 times its current mass to attain a central temperature high enough to sustain hydrogen (pp chain) ...


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Transmuting chemically significant quantities of one element to another using nuclear reactions is not cost effective for any naturally occurring element. Nuclear physics is the end of alchemy. Two examples I happen have off the top of my head: the "Fat Man" and "Little Boy" nuclear weapons deployed in the second world war each involved about $10^{24}$ ...


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The iron-peak elements are mostly the product of alpha capture reactions onto nuclei that begin with a similar number of neutrons and protons ($Z = N$). The nuclear burning associated with carbon and oxygen (in type Ia supernovae) or silicon (in the cores of massive stars at the ends of their lives) is very fast or even explosive. The important reactions in ...


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The final stage of nucleosynthesis at the core of a massive star involves the production of iron-peak elements, mostly determined by competition between alpha capture and photodisintegration. The starting material is mostly Si28 and weak processes are unable to significantly alter the n/p ratio from unity on short enough timescales. Thus the expected outcome ...


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A very nice question about a common misconception in books on astrophysics (I've made the same mistake in a comment here). According to M.P. Fewell, the origin of this misconception lies in the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis and the abundance of the elements. While other nuclei have higher binding energy per nucleon, $^{56}\mathrm{Fe}$ is more abundant ...


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After doing some more research I found the answer to my question. The method I proposed was actually one of the first methods for hydrogen-boron fusion that was tested. It's called "fixed/solid target proton-boron-11 fusion". Experimentation very quickly showed that the method could not work because of two big problems: As #dmckee already commented above, ...


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You question isn't specific enough; it needs a little work to clarify the fusion setup. For example, what fuel type are you talking about fusing? Is there confinement, so that this is a thermal fusion reaction, or would just one fusion reaction be sufficient? For example, the temperature required to overcome the Coulomb barrier for deuterium-tritium ...


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The "weight" must surely refer to the atomic weight which is just the sum of the number of protons and neutrons. i.e. for Iron it is (usually) 56. Many of the chemical elements heavier than iron are formed inside giant stars via the s-process. This is the slow neutron capture onto iron-peak seed nuclei. It is normally termed "neutron capture", but I suppose ...



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