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Generally, you are correct, and trying to store gaseous hydrogen for long periods of time without significant losses doesn't work. The usual way around this is use lithium deuteride, a solid compound, as the main fuel in the fusion portion of the device (the secondary). Deuterium/tritium is also used in the fission primary. According to ...


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Look up Lithium deuteride: a form of lithium hydride where the hydrogen is all deuterium: this will give you most of your answers. The main fusion[1] reaction that lets slip most of the energy and thus the horrendous blast in a fusion bomb is: $$_1^2 D + _1^3 T \rightarrow _2^4 He (3.5{\rm MeV}) + _0^1 n (14.1{\rm MeV})\tag{1}$$ Here I've written $D$ for ...


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The amount of energy per cubic metre in a degenerate gas depends on the density and composition of that material. I can only give some examples - any specific mixtures or densities would require individual calculation. The energy density of an ideal, completely degenerate gas of fermions is given by $$u = \frac{\pi m^4 c^5}{h^3} \left[ ...


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If Rob Jeffries numbers are right (Here) and it seems as good a baseline as any, you get about 3*10^15th Joules per KG of Neutron Star matter. The Hiroshima bomb was about 6*10^13th Joules, so just 1 KG of degenerate matter, you'd be looking at about 50 Hiroshima bombs released in kinetic energy, in the form of (I think) mostly Neutrons. 1 KG of hydrogen ...



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