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No. For one, you can have frequency lower than one. Think of Sun's frequency in the skies, it crosses the sky once per day, not one per second. On the other hand, it crosses the sky in different place every day during the year, until it gets back to where it was today in one year. So in this regard the fundamental frequency is really once per year.


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The definition of fundamental frequency should be: the lowest frequency of a periodic wave satisfying some boundary conditions. For example, in the case of the vibrating string: The lowest frequency is determined by the length of the string (top of the image), the tension in the string, and the mass per unit length. Of course, if there are no boundary ...


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Is the photon physically oscillating through space as it travels? I wouldnt imagine so. Which periodic occurrence is referred to when one talks about the frequency of a particle? No the photon is not oscillating through space. It is an elementary particle of the standard model which is the quantum mechanical description of most of our experimental ...


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The easiest way to see frequencies is in interference. Imagine you have waves coming towards a wall. Imagine too that the frequency of the waves is way higher that what you can see. You cannot directly observe the waves, but you will see that the wall is wet a few centimetres over the surface. Now, instead of one wave, you have two coming from different ...


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Well, the key difference here is that one is a vector quantity while the other is a scalar. If your angle is measured in radians then angular frequency $\omega$ is given by $$ \omega = 2 \pi f \space \mbox{(rad)} s^{-1} $$ while angular velocity is $$ \vec{\Omega} = \frac{d \vec{v}}{dt} \mbox{m} \space s^{-1} $$ What you have above is the magnitude of ...


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The formula $f = \frac{1}{T}$ gives the fundamental frequency of a periodic signal with period $T$. But periodic signals can be composed of (can be the sum of) an infinity of sinusoids of related frequencies, e.g., a square wave, so in general, we can't speak of the frequency of a periodic signal. For an aperiodic signal, there is no fundamental ...


1

In most cases you can't pick one $f$ to define a random signal. You can however break parts of the signal into frequency components for a fixed sample time of the signal. This is called a Fourier Transform and for sampled data see Discrete Fourier Transform. You can also talk about frequency characteristics of the signal like bandwidth, center frequencies, ...


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Nonperiodic signals can be described by their frequency spectrum. If you think of a sine, this signal has only one frequency. If you think of a signal that is the sum of three sine waves with different frequencies the signal has 3 frequencies. Nonperiodic signals are viewed as the sum of an infinite sum of periodic signals. Check out the Fourier analysis. ...


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Another thing that happens that can lead you to think that low frequency sounds attenuate quicker is that if you record yourself one time being close to the microphone and another time being farther away, you'll notice that the farther you are the more the lowest frequencies are picked up. This is due to the proximity effect and not to the low frequency ...


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Taste: There are 5 basic tastes that the human tongue can detect. They are sweet, savory, salty, sour and bitter. These are detected by taste receptor cells on our tongue, I won't go deep into the biology part. The basic tastes of sweet, salty and sour have different thresholds, or concentration levels, at which they can be detected. In other words, it is ...


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Taste and smell are mediated by receptors in your body that molecules can attach to. These receptors then give off an electrical signal which is translated in the brain to a certain taste or smell. The details of this are biological and not of importance here. So no, there is no relevant frequency or even wave-like behavior. Touch is a very different thing. ...


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You are right. Like any physical process described by linear equations, there are limits. Think of a sound so intense as to crush the cells in a sound absorbing foam, turning it into a hard surface. A reversible version of that foam is one where the bubbles don't get destroyed, they get flattened to the point that the material they are in starts to play a ...


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The surface of the sun is where local plasma cools enough to recombine and go transparent, the photosphere. You would still be deep within the sun's atmosphere, and it would be LOUD. H-bombs are LOUD at the edge of their fireballs.


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helioseismology is what you need to learn about. yes, there are sound waves in Sun


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It can be done, but there's some trade offs. Larger speakers are better at moving longer wavelength (low frequency) waves. When you try to combine a bunch of small surfaces in different locations to recreate a single wave you end up with a some random interference where the wave is stronger or weaker (in 3d-space) (see phased-array antenna for some ...


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A vector quantity has a direction and a magnitude. The direction of the rotational velocity vector is along the axis around which a body is rotating. Its magnitude is the rotational frequency which tells you how fast the body is rotating.


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There exists indeed a subtle difference, and are often referred to as angular frequency and angular velocity. Both are $\omega$ and have units $\text{s}^{-1}$. The difference lies in the fact that angular frequency is the magnitude of angular velocity, and is hence a scalar-, instead of vector quantity. The direction of the vector is perpendicular to the ...


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You have to assume a certain shape for the torque curve. For example if the torque is more of less constant then $$ T = \frac{P_1}{\omega_1} = \frac{P_2}{\omega_2} $$ $$ \frac{200}{4000} = \frac{P}{5000} $$ It helps to know the rpm of peak torque, as typically torque varies as a parabola near that point. Depending on the valvetrain, the torque curve will ...



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