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3

A good question, you are right the frequency remains constant (unless you have Doppler effects due to relative movement, but that's not your question). For visible light, refraction properties are quite often in question and as such it make sense to speak in terms of wavelength. As you go even higher in "frequency", physicists start talking in keV and MeV ...


0

The standing waves you introduced are models for how air moves as it resonates. In fact, each is called a mode (of oscillation). In the continuum approximation of air being an infinitely divisible, continuous fluid, you need infinitely many of them to simultaneously model arbitrary resonating movement. In practice, you can hope to neglect all but low ...


0

The wavelength is fixed by the dimensional length of the tube, but since wavelength is equal to the speed of sound divided by the wave frequency, temperature will affect the frequency because temperature determines the speed of sound.


14

The wavelengths that stimulate vitamin D production are between 280nm and 320nm, which is called UVB. You would need to use a detector capable of measuring light in this wavelength. However there is no need, because normal windows are made from soda-lime glass and this transmits no wavelengths shorter than about 350nm. Some Googling will find you the ...


1

Yes it is the (square root of) amplitude versus frequency. It presumably breaks the audio into short intervals and then DFT's each interval individually. The DFT of the entire sound would not be very insightful.


4

The uncertainty principle limits our ability to determine the wavelength of a particle with infinite precision. At the same time, there is no fundamental reason why any two photons (even if generated by exactly the same process) should produce exactly the same wavelength; however, you can be sure that there will be plenty that are the same within the limits ...


-1

Surely you'd agree that all electrons and protons are $exactly$ the same (indistinguishable). Now consider a regular Hydrogen-1 isotope: A proton and an electron bound together. There's definitely more than just one of these atoms in the observable universe. Well then consider an electron floating around the $n=2$ shell of a Hydrogen-1 isotope, then ...


1

Yes, a photon is defined by its wavelength, which also directly relates to its energy. I'm not sure what you mean by interacting with other particles, but a simple glass prism is able to separate the different wavelengths of white light into its constituent bands. The wavelength of a photon of light is related to its energy by planck's constant. ...


1

You are asking about wavelength, but your question is a problem not very well-posed. Then, let's say so: from a single photon we cannot get a conclusion about it characteristics. Only if we know the beam to which the photon belongs, can we know the wavelength (or wavelengths see below). Next, the wavelength is the result of preparation of the beam, it is ...


0

Normally fretting a string requires pulling the string down, which adds tension to the string. If a string is already fretted then the greater tension must be offset by using a lower position for the upper fret.


0

If you are playing in just intonation (where, when you play two notes, they are in the same harmonic series), then it would depend on which notes in particular you are playing and which key you are in, because the frequency of each note would be related to the tonic (by ratios) and independently of each other. Some intervals are thus wider or narrower than ...



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