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If you are playing in just intonation (where, when you play two notes, they are in the same harmonic series), then it would depend on which notes in particular you are playing and which key you are in, because the frequency of each note would be related to the tonic (by ratios) and independently of each other. Some intervals are thus wider or narrower than ...


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This is the plot of sunlight, red at ground level. Solar irradiance spectrum above atmosphere and at surface. Extreme UV and X-rays are produced (at left of wavelength range shown) but comprise very small amounts of the Sun's total output power. As all light comes from the sun during daylight this should suffice. One can get the number of photons by ...


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Since no one else has mentioned it ... If you want to have a better conceptual understanding of the apparent slowing of light (and other electromagnetic waves) in materials, I strongly suggest reading Richard Feynman's lectures, especially Chapter 31 of volume I. That will give you much more explanation than is possible in this forum. All the Feynman ...


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Speed of light is constant in vacuum but different electromagnetic waves travel at different speeds in different media due to different refractive index.


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Because that is the result when you examine the process in detail. For example: The boy and the train are in a static relationship. The train could sound its whistle for as long as the power source held out. If the boy received more waves per second than the train produced, where would the extra waves come from? Or: The wind is snatching the waves from ...


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You asked: but then the frequency would not change on the way back since the source is not moving (and is thus not subject to the doppler effect), right? No, that's not right. The Doppler effect of sound depends on the relative velocitiesof both source and listener, compared to the medium. The Doppler effect for light depends on the relative velocity ...


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Your formula is for using Doppler shift with relativistic speeds. For this problem all of the speeds involved are much smaller then the speed of light, making the problem not relative. Here's a derivation of a formula: The radar gun will produce waves with frequency $f_0$ traveling at the speed of light $c$ toward the car. This results in a wavelength ...



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