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You can imagine it in a simple way without any confusion: A lift descending with a>g implies that it 'falls' at a faster rate than g. In other words, the ceiling of the elevator moves downwards(w.r.t a ground frame) faster than a free falling object(which according to the ground frame is the ball). Isn't it obvious now why it would appear to rise w.r.t ...


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Yes, your argument using pseudo force is correct. The ball will continue to accelerate upwards, as observed by you, who is accelerating downwards with acceleration $a>g$. I think there is no "common sense" in your scenario, because seldom will people be inside a lift accelerating downloads with $a>g$. My "common sense" is: the ball is free falling ...


2

When you jump from a height, you gather momentum. Absorbing this momentum at landing reduces the size of the maximum force, and thus the "pain". Let us assume that the distance over which a person can absorb the momentum of the fall is proportional to their height (proportional to the length of their legs). In that case, the taller person can absorb the ...


0

Would you decrease your impact impulse by jumping during the fall? Yes When? Soon enough that it's before impact, late enough that you don't hit the ceiling of the elavator. Beyond that I don't think it matters much. Would it help if you jump inside a free falling elevator? Probably not. Indeed I expect it would make things worse. The ...



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