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The only condition for free fall as you said is that the motion of the body should be only under the influence of gravity alone. There should not be any effect of other forces like air resistance, viscous drag etc. The condition depends on the property of the material under free fall. For example, if the body has a certain mass as well as charged, it causes ...


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In the quote cited you could imagine that point particles move in a straight line at a steady velocity and don't rotate when far from massive objects. So to a small accelerating frame, they look like a non rotating point particle moving at a constant velocity would look to an accelerating frame. But maybe point particles near a massive object have similar ...


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In order to solve this question, you have to calculate distance travelled in 4 seconds as well as in 3 seconds. And then subtract these two to get the distance travelled from 3rd to 4th second (which is 3rd second). What you did was that you calculated the total distance travelled from $t=0$ to $t=3$ seconds, instead you have to find the distance travelled ...


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In addition to the already given answears this also might be of interest: When hammer and feather are dropped simultaneously they arrive at the same time, when dropped independently the hammer attracts the planet more than the feather, so you are right, the total time until impact is then smaller for the hammer. If you pick up the hammer and let it fall to ...


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The error is just to consider an average speed $h\omega$. When the particle is at height $z$, its horizontal (relative to the Earth) speed is $v=2z\omega$. The time of of flight is $$t=\sqrt{\frac{2z}{g}}.$$ Differentiating this expression we get the time taken by the particle to move a distance $dz$, $$dt=\frac{dz}{\sqrt{2gz}}.$$ The horizontal distance ...


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The gravitational forces acting on the two objects due to their interaction when 5 m apart have magnitudes of approx. 2.7e-2 N, giving initial horizontal accelerations of approximately 2.7e-8 and 2.7e-6 m/s^2. In the 1.49 s it takes for the two objects to reach Earth, those accelerations will change negligibly. The smaller mass will travel along a very ...


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If the gravity is caused by an infinite plane of mass, then yes: the equivalence is exact. In this case, Einstein original viewed gravity as a consequence of gravitational time dilation. Enter Earth: now the apples' paths cross--much like 2 nearby people walking on great circles around Earth. Thus, he realized the metric of space-time is curved.



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