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Your starting point is incorrect. You say: The point is, Rindler's observer shows us that the "action" of an accelerated observer on space-time is non trivial (there exists a black hole behind a uniformly accelerated observer). You're correct that there is a singularity, but it is only a coordinate singularity. The Riemann tensor is everywhere zero in ...


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This is the so called "principle of uniformity". Basically, it stipulates that the laws of physics are the same everywhere in space and time. Now, why should we believe in such principle ? I have thought a bit about that, and here is my reasoning. Let's define two "types" (in the sense of logic) of "objects". Call pobject, any physical object you can see, ...


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Principles of statics is a consequence of the principle of minimum of potential energy. You could write down the full potential energy of the system $U(x _1,\ ...,\ x_n)$ and minimize it regarding constraints equations $F_k(x _1,\ ...,\ x_n)=0.$ Doing it using Lagange multipliers you'll obtain equations of static: $$\frac {\partial U}{\partial x _i } - ...


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I'm not sure that the concept of a force is fictitious. I've heard Engineers say that forces aren't real and that there are only couples, but I wonder if this is more about semantics than anything else. It seems like physicists are always inventing new forces! To me, a force is something you put on the right hand side of the second derivative of some ...


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Your toy theory is i) local and ii) sounds like it's counter-factual definite, that is, every measurement that could be or could have been performed would result in a single, definite outcome (roughly speaking, an object's properties are pre-existing or real). You want to know whether you can evade Bell's inequalities [that permit i) or ii) but not both], ...



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