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The finding of such a particle would overturn Einstein's theories of relativity, which state that light-speed is a cosmic constant and cannot be passed by anything in the universe. Such superluminal particles would also have the ability to time travel (hypothetically). This would be caused since as a particle approaches the speed of light, time slows down. ...


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No physical signal can travel at a speed that is greater than the speed of light because if it did an effect would precede the cause. This is a consequence of the Lorentz transformations.


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No, they don't disprove it. However the Alcubierre metric, which underlies the warp drive stuff, requires something people refer to as 'exotic matter' which in this case means matter with negative energy density. Such matter violates many assumptions, and would normally be considered not to be possible (indeed my memory of Alcubierre's original paper is ...


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One argument goes as follows: Maxwell's equations predict many things, but you can massage them into a form exactly like an equation that describes a broad variety of waves. Call this "the wave equation". So imagine you have a container of water and you generate ripples. You could move your head and travel along with one ripple, so that from your point of ...


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There were a couple of clues that Einstein and others found that led to the conclusion that the speed of light was special. First, using Maxwell's equations, you can derive the existence of electromagnetic waves that travel at $$c = \frac{1}{\sqrt{\mu_o\epsilon_0}} \approx 300,000\, \textrm{km/sec}$$ where $\mu_0$ and $\epsilon_0$ are constants you can ...


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As per the comments, I wasn't taking into account the relativistic addition of velocities, which is becomes relevant when designing scenarios with such high velocities. So for a observer in the point specified in my argument, the fastest objects (object #1 million, object #999.999, ...) would appear to have velocities close to light speed, but they would ...


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It does indeed have something to do with time dilation. You can use the formula $$s=\frac{v+u}{1+(uv/c^{^{2}})}$$ where s is the speed of one spaceship relative to the other while u and v are their speeds relative to the Earth. I think you will find whatever values of u and v you use s will always be smaller than c.


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There is one proposition you assumed on your experiment that is driving you to a false conclusion: the hypotesis that the block, on the A side, would move forward instantaneously. Every interaction in the universe occurs, ultimately, only locally. This is not always taken in account because the minimalistic point of view (that is, the point of view that ...


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There is no such material as "Non-compressible" to that extent - Even in a "least-compressible" rod, the push itself would be carried by electromagnetic forces from atom to atom. These forces also can not travel faster than light. So, the poke can not reach before light. The delay is inside the rod. Meaning the movement does not reach the other end faster ...



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