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And why more toward yellow than green? Human vision and perception of colors is a complex process. It is safe to say humans are not very good at determining the actual spectral distribution of light they see. The sunlight may very well have frequency distribution that has maximum in green and humans may still see it as having different coloration. That ...


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Note the vertical scale on the two graphs you gave: The solar spectrum at sea level is given as an intensity (power per area), and it is very nearly flat over most of the visual range. The eye sensitivity is given as a percentage, which the wikipedia page where it is used does not explain beyond calling it "normalized" and "relative brightness sensitivity." ...


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Missing from these answers is that CCDs like your camera can't, in principle, see a Fourier transform. Even if you stick a lens at the focal plain you won't see the Fourier Transform! Your camera is not an interferometer! Borrowing the equation from Colin K's answer we see that the integral, can be negative, positive or even imaginary. \begin{equation} ...


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Trying to break my bad habit of answering in comments, putting my previous stuff down here now. As I said, I'm largely drawing on a blog post I did a couple years ago, working out the color of the sky. I had a spectrum, and I wanted a color. As I mentioned above, you can't just take a spectrum and output an equivalent wavelength--only some colors are so ...


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You're overthinking the theory. Think practically and the answer is obvious. The standard eyeball has a crystalline lense whose focal length is varied by the ciliary muscles. The maximum and minimum accommodation of focal length is what determines far point and near point respectively. The near point and far point have to be regarded as properties of the ...



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