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When your house heats up, it is receiving the contribution from the hot air outside, plus the sun's radiated heat. When cooling in the Winter, the factors are the cooler air and the radiation loss, which is not comparable to the sun's.


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Fans make air molecules move, and the energy is in a such case converted to kinetic energy. TV:s, and everything else with screens, are also giving off photons, which carries energy. All electronics also produce heat, which is a form of energy. In the end almost all energy is in some way or an other converted into heat, due to Thermodynamics – or more ...


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When thinking about converting into another form, it does not have to be usable energy again for example when fan spins it makes sound due to it hitting other air molecules and thus giving them energy and so causes noise and heats up air every so slightly(after all noise is air vibrating). Next, the energy is converted into heat due to the friction between ...


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The fan increases the kinetic energy of the air molecules in the room. From there the energy usually dissipates uselessly (molecules bouncing off of each other, different objects, and you) but if you tried holding up a pinwheel, it would rotate proving that the energy has just been converted to a new type. The net result of the fan is a rise in temperature, ...


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So what I understand from reading the other answers is this: Here on earth: 1 Kilogram of lettuce: Mass-> 1 Kg, Weight-> 1 Kgf In another hypotetical planet where gravity is half of earth: 1 Kilogram of lettuce: Mass-> 1 Kg, Weight-> 0.5 Kgf Since there is no practical easy way to measure mass, in everyday life we use the kilogram as a unit of weight ...


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It is not that the interviewee experiences a longer delay - but that you see the whole scene delayed by the same amount. Delays are caused by a number of factors: sound is conveyed in packets that are digitized, compressed, and converted at various points along their path: at each point they experience at least "one packet's worth" of delays (can't send ...


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It is more often the case that the broadcast is delayed a few seconds so that if the phone-in participant says something that the show's producers don't like it can be easily censored.


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The Slip% is defined by SAE as $S=\frac{\omega\,R-V}{V}$ Where $\omega$ is the wheel rotation in radians per time, $R$ is the effective tire Radius, and $V$ road velocity of the vehicle. For example if my wheel has a radius of 1 ft and my instantaneous rotating speed is 50 radians per second, then my expected velocity would be 50 ft per second. If at the ...


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To simplify we can treat the wire as perfectly taut. This allows the rope to exert a force on the tight rope walker (TRW) Also for simplicity imagine the TRW as a solid body with a solid body pole that can be rotated about an axis parallel to the rope at a fixed location relative to the TRW. Now, if the TRW is tipping clockwise their center of gravity ...


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I will start with the short version of the answer and then move to a little longer version of it. We do not observe quantum behavior in real life because of the limitations of our biological architecture. A little longer version We didn't need to have evolutionary traits that are attuned to quantum phenomena. It is the reason why quantum physics ...


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Actually, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle certainly appears in everyday life, and in some cases, drives what we see classically. Take for example a pencil balanced on its point. Assume you want to know the length of time that it can be balanced on its point. So, the standard thing to do is to consider a pencil with mass $m$ and length $l$, something ...


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According to this article, we can’t observe quantum effects of large-scale objects (such as a car) because we live in a strong gravitational field caused by the Earth. General Relativity says that a gravitational field causes time dilation. … when an object is in superposition, all its parts vibrate in synchrony. However, time dilation will cause parts ...


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The dehumidifier is probably more efficient. When the wet clothes are drying, there is a latent heat of evaporation that will cool down the basement as the water evaporates. You then have to run the dehumidifier to cause this water to condense again - in the process you will heat the room (as you expel the excess heat). In principle, no heat leaves the ...


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Without knowing a lot more about the details of the entire system, we can't say exactly what the difference will be between the AC1+AC2 case and the AC2-only case. However, there are a few things we can work out from simple energy balance. In the following, I'm considering the air as an ideal gas with a fixed specific heat capacity at constant pressure ...


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If you're objective is to cool down the office, and you have a machine blowing air into the office which is warmer than the current (indoor) ambient temp. then I would by all means turn the damned thing off! air conditioners are heat pumps, just like a fridge. They take in the ambient air, pass it over a cool surface (to absorb the energy from the air) and ...


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As mentioned in the comments, this is an instance of supercooling. When you cool a liquid below its freezing point, the molecules are still moving around quite a lot and any two that stick together are likely to be broken up by a subsequent impact. Liquids freeze better when the molecules have something to latch onto -- either a block of the same ice they ...



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