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Good question. I think the event horizon has to be absolute, because as you suggested, light either gets out or it doesn't. I venture to suggest that isn't in accord with what most here would say is current teaching, but here's a couple of interesting facts: 1) Light is not redshifted when it ascends, and nor is it blueshifted when it descends. You can work ...


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The definition of the event horizon is `the boundary of the past of future null infinity', so it is the surface beyond which nothing can escape to infinity. It isn't defined with reference to any observer. A consequence of the definition is that an observer can never really determine where the event horizon is, since its location depends on all future ...


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I) For a single$^1$ spherically symmetric thin-shell collapse with (rest) mass $m$, the geometry inside the shell is flat Minkowski space, cf. e.g. this Phys.SE post; and outside the shell the geometry is Schwarzschild geometry with Schwarzschild radius $R_s=2E$ in natural units, where $$E~=~ m\sqrt{1+\left(\frac{dR}{d\tau}\right)^2} - \frac{m^2}{2R} ...


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The light due to Hawking radiation will only ever be detected from very tiny black holes. The Hawking radiation scales as the inverse square of the black hole mass, but the radiation causes the black hole mass to decrease. This causes accelerated emission, such that all tiny black holes will go through a phase of emitting all their rest mass as $10^{22}$ J ...


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Hawking radiation is such a miniscule effect we can be sure we'll never detect it for a real astrophysical black hole. The Wikipedia article gives some numbers: For a black hole of the mass of the Sun, the power emitted in Hawking radiation amounts to $9\times10^{-29}\ \mathrm{W}$. Even if all this energy were converted to visible-light photons ...



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