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There is a relatively new theory (2012) called the firewall theory, that says that at the event horizon there is a huge "wall of fire" as such. This is because quantum entangled particles that cross the horizon (or one half of a pair of entangled particles) becomes tricky and starts breaking laws like the monogamy of entanglement. So a group of physicists ...


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This is explained thoroughly in Thorne's book "The Science of Interstellar". There were two scientific papers based on the simulations: One in physics and one in computer rendering. The two circles are caused by gravitational lensing by a very rapidly spinning black hole. The radius of this black hole is 150 million kilometers with a mass of 100 million ...


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First note that this is a fictional movie and the image is an artist's impression, not a detailed simulation. The public seems to think the movie is some sort of fictionalized documentary, which it never claimed to be. That said, the image is qualitatively conveying some of what happens near a black hole. The diagonal disk is the accretion disk -- this is ...


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The horizontal circle is probably the accretion disc of the black hole. The vertical circle might depict the effect of gravitational lensing (although I am not sure this depiction is accurate).


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One thing to note is that this horizon would only be present in an idealized eternal black hole, for a realistic non-rotating black hole formed by a collapsing star the Kruskal-Szekeres diagram would look more like the right-hand diagram below (from Gravitation by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler), where the gray area represents the interior of the star and the ...


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For the first part you are correct but it is a bit of an illusion. If say a person fell into a black hole, then there are two perspectives: From the perspective of the person, they fall straight in (ignoring whether they survive to observe it or not). From an outside observer the person appears to slow down as they approach the event horizon of the black ...


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The answer is it depends on which observer we are talking about - an observer "with" the collapsing mass sees it and them crushed to a singularity; an external observer "sees" (though see below) the mass frozen just at the event horizon. In GR and a standard black hole, there is only one future for a mass that finds itself at or inside the event horizon, ...


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c will always remain a constant with respect to space itself. We can't define a speed relative to space itself, only relative to an observer. In GR, we can only define speed relative to a nearby observer. To a nearby observer, the speed of light is always $c$, because GR is locally the same as SR. the only reason I understand for a change in the ...


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The event horizon of a non-rotating black hole is spherical. The "pit" illustration represents the gravitational well created by the hole. It demonstrates the "warping" of spacetime described by the equations of general relativity.


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The size of a black hole is defined by the radius of its event horizon, instead of the "size" of the singularity. Plus, a singularity is not a point, but a spacelike hypersurface. As long as you are far away from the singularity, there is no difference that you can tell from a star. The gravity is the same. Gravity being massive is because the surface ...



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