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While the answer of wbeaty is very interesting in showing points relevant in practice, I think all the answers are still missing an important and simple theoretical point, which you should consider to understand the process. vapour pressure does mean two different things as used above. First, the pressure, the existing water vapour would have (if it were ...


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When the vapor pressure is equal to the external pressure, there will form a bubble. Not true. Instead, when the vapor pressure is equal to the external pressure, then any existing bubbles will begin growing continuously. And, if no bubbles are already present, then the water will superheat far above the boiling temperature, yet no bubbles will ...


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A possible explanation is simply that the air and water have not equilibrated due to the high heat capacity of water. It's the same reason you can jump in a lake in the early summer and it still be cold. So if you filled up a glass from the sink and measured it 15 minutes later, it's entirely possible that it would be cooler. A more detailed description of ...


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This could be explained by evaporative cooling. That would match all of the (extremely scant) information you have provided about your experimental setup and results. If you would like a more thorough analysis of possible causes, you are going to need to write at least a couple sentences (preferably even more than that!) about your experimental setup. ...


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Drying happens when dry air comes into contact with a wet surface. There are a lot of variables in that. The dryness of the air, the dampness of the material, different temperatures and sources of heat, currents in the air, flows in the water... Nothing is more unlikely than "all things being equal" in the instances you have observed. Anyway, let's imagine ...



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