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One very popular view (as espoused by Max Tegmark) is that (quoting count_to_10) : math works because the universe is based on math http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-the-universe-made-of-math-excerpt/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_universe_hypothesis Such a view was common from the time of Pythagoras, through to Kepler and ...


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No, a physical theory can never be "proven". There is a classical metaphor to illustrate why, known as the black swan problem or problem of induction. If in your entire life you have only see white swans, you will formulate the general law (or theory) that all the swans are white. You will then keep seeing only white swans -thousands of them- and think "my ...


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I would not agree that a theory is the same as a hypothesis. Rather I would argue that hypotheses are formulated within the framework a theory. Theory refers to the whole body of knowledge, usually driven by observations. The statements of a theory are validated by empirical data. Theory provides names and concepts for the observations so that scientists ...


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In a strict true/false sense, every scientific statement is false. For example, the following two statemaents are both false: The Earth is flat. The Earth is a sphere. However, the second statement is much closer to the truth than the first. [1] It is this kind of closeness to truth that distinguishes a scientific hypothesis from a scientific theory. In ...


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The sentence, as it is quoted, seems moot to me. In fact, it would apply to any logic theory: a logic theory is nothing else that a collection of statements assumed to be true (axioms/hypotheses - the name is not so important), and a collection of logic symbols and rules of inference (also assumed to be true) that codify how you can get new true sentences ...



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