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Yes. A polarizing filter absorbs the wave polarized orthogonally to the polarization direction of the polarizer. Assume that the particles are photons in the polarization singlet, |Singlet> = (1/sqrt(2)) {|x>|x> + |y>|y>}. For simplicity let x be the direction of polarization transmitted by the filter for one of the particles. You see that in the ...


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Yes, as it turns out there are distinct types of multipartite entanglement not witnessed by the spectra of reduced states. The simplest example is probably the one from Bennett et al., "Exact and asymptotic measures of multipartite pure-state entanglement", Phys. Rev. A 63, 012307 (2000). For the case of three 4-dimensional systems, consider the states ...


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To answer your question shortly: No, they are not the same phenomenon. First of all, it is much easier to think of quantum states as vectors (in something called the Hilbert space, but simply put they obey linearity), and not as particles or waves. Superposition Let's start with a single particle qubit (since you're talking about quantum information) ...


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First of all the words "exchange of information" are not so good. An entanglement is a CONSTRAINT on two particles or more. For instance the famous PHOTON SINGLET is described by the state (1) |Ψ> = [!/sqrt(2)] {|u>|u> + |v>|v>} where u is whatever direction in space that we want to choose, and v is perpendicular to x in the polarization plane (which is ...


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Please believe me that if the experiment were done not with two pairs of entangled photons, but with two pairs of entangled electrons, the results were similar, except that the wave-function of two entangled fermions is antisymmetrical instead of symmetrical. So, the light velocity plays no role here. I recommend you look at the equation (2) in the article ...



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