Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

No. Wormholes do not play a role in entanglement. In fact, entangled particles don't 'communicate' in the usual sense; instead, they show nonlocal correlations which can sometimes exceed what you'd expect from, say, a pair of boxes containing socks of different colours. What Einstein got wrong wasn't the 'spooky', it was the 'action' - neither particle acts ...


2

Imagine you have a pair of coins. Whenever you throw them, each of them is fully random, but their outcomes are opposite. Now imagine you throw the two coins. You look at the left coin. When it is head, you discard both coins and start again, when it is tail, you keep it. Since you have never looked at the right coin, it should still be completely random. ...


2

Your mistake was thinking each particle has a state. If that were the case they would not be entangled. What happens is you have a joint state for the pair of particles. Since it starts out a joint state, when you act on the state you act on a joint state so it affects the joint state. And yes, what we call an observation or a measurement changes the ...


1

An important thing to understand is that Bell's Inequality is about how certain (incorrect) theories make predictions. It tells you absolutely nothing about other theories, not matter how similar the theories sound. For instance Ball assumed that there is a hidden variable that combines with the orientations to tell you the results but that the hidden ...


1

No. Being entangled does not mean they mirror everything the other does. It only means certain properties are in an inseparable state. Destroying one of the pair would end this state


1

No. The other photon might even be forbidden to produce a pair over by itself all by itself since there might be no nucleus over by it. The other photon doesn't have to copy what the first one does. But many things could happen to the entanglement. And that is partly because there are many ways the photons could have been entangled. For instance, you could ...


1

No. The particles have a joint spin state, $\left|\uparrow \downarrow \right\rangle - \left|\downarrow \uparrow\right\rangle.$ When you send the left particle through a Stern-Gerlach device then the device changes from $\left|0\right\rangle$ to $\left|1\right\rangle$ when the left particle is detected as down. So $\left(\left|\uparrow \downarrow ...


1

Entanglement experiment performed in one frame of reference guarantees that the two measured results are synchronized in this frame of reference. If we try to perform the same entangled experiment while the two ends of the same length fiber optic lines are attached to two frames of references moving with a constant relative velocity, the two measured results ...


1

The diagram of the experiment has a large box bearing the legend "coincidence counter". The experiment is measuring fringes in the probability of a match in the photons' location. The probability for each individual photon to arrive at a specific place is not changed by different measurements. The probability of a match in location when the results are ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible