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37

You've caught a non-intuitive part of Newton's 3rd law. It's actually applying in the case you mention, but because the objects involved are of dissimilar hardness it's easy to perceive the impact as a violation of the law. Impacts are actually really complicated. Consider this slow motion video of a punch to the gut. We won't be able to cover all of the ...


10

What makes you think that the maximum force you applied to the dry wall was anything like the maximum force you applied to the brick? It certainly wasn't. The dry wall gave way much before you were able to attain the same force as applied to the brick. Try punching the air and see how much force you are able to apply. The experimental evidence that the ...


8

There is no doubt the Newton's third law holds in this case. The source of confusion is the fact that you are neglecting the time interval of the collision as well as the momentum change the colliding body. As we shall see it is incorrect to assume you applied the same force in both cases just because you started with the same initial conditions, i.e. the ...


7

TL;DR: The physics of hitting things are not as easy as exerting a constant force on something. What I am trying to say with that is that Newton's law of course applies, but it would be more obvious to see it if you were just pushing/leaning against the wall with your weight. Then I'd say the two walls probably feel roughly the same. So what is different ...


4

... an electron is point sized Here you find what John Rennie says about this: Although it's commonly said that fundamental particles are point particles you need to be clear what this means. To measure the size of the particle to within some experimental error d requires the use of a probe with a wavelength of λ=d or less i.e. with an energy of ...


3

The time-independent Schrodinger equation $\hat{H} \psi = E \psi$ only holds when the Hamiltonian does not depend explicitly on time. If you start with a time-independent Hamiltonian and make a time-dependent gauge transformation, then the new Hamiltonian will depend explicitly on time, and there is no reason to expect that the (time-dependent) eigenvalues ...


3

In a nutshell, no. Part of the problem seems to be that you misunderstand the fundamentals of string theory. The strings do vibrate. The frequency of these vibrations determines the type of particle and the energy of the string determines the energy of the particle. Second, your understanding of the uncertainty principle isn't quite right. Yes, we cannot ...


2

The more fundamental thing to understand are the conservation laws, particularly the conservation of momentum and of energy. The availability of energy gives rise to force. When you move your fist towards an object at a particular velocity you contain within it a kinetic energy and momentum. Materials are held together with binding forces that, at the ...


2

Usually in engineering lingo, negative pressure means below-atmospheric pressure. If flue gases are at atmospheric pressure, then to make them flow towards the fan, the fan must create a negative pressure region at its inlet. Subsequently there is rise in pressure across the fan, going from inlet side to outlet side. Power supplied to fan is expended in ...


1

To answer this question, you'd have to agree on what model of the electron you're talking about. Quantum mechanical? Classical? Electrons can have force exerted on them by electric fields. If this causes the electron to move, then work is done to it. Thus, energy is transfered "to" the electron.


1

In addition to the other answer by Cort Ammon, I have heard of other psychophysical/evolutionary explanation: The frequency distribution of that sound closely corresponds to the frequency of a crying baby, which has been shown to drive people crazy when exposed to it for a short amount of time (we are genetically predisposed to get distressed by such a ...


1

From http://www.livescience.com/16967-fingernails-chalkboard-painful.html: Interestingly, the most painful frequencies were not the highest or lowest, but instead were those that were between 2,000 and 4,000 Hz. The human ear is most sensitive to sounds that fall in this frequency range, said Michael Oehler, professor of media and music management at the ...


1

Interferometer "questions": clearly the mirrors can impart energy to the light and vice versa. But I think that a part of the answer is more fundamental than this: according to Feynman the passage of a detectable gravitational wave imparts energy to any coupled massy environment through which it passes, and indeed this is necessary for gravitational waves to ...


1

If we measure length by a scale there is no change of energy. So it depends on subjects to be measured.



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