Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

It is not that easy. Now one engine is delivering about twice as much torque and was probably not designed for that. An engine specifically designed to deliver more torque would like be more efficient than the two combined. Lets look torque alone. Ignore the tow rope and assume the second is far enough back to not get any draft. In this case wind ...


2

The energy gets converted into the form of heat and sound. In this way the energy is conserved.


1

Assuming that the angle theta is measured relative to the vertical (e.g., the position of the string when the pendulum is at rest), a careful free body analysis indicates that the acceleration of the pendulum is g * sin(theta). This means that the acceleration of the pendulum continuously varies as it swings. This is relevant because the kinematic ...


1

Typically, the Friction force will be proportional to the velocity of the object it affects (or at least it is usually assumed to be proportional). The Force you describe is constant and pointing in negative x-direction. The situation you are describing resembles an object on a Hookean spring in a gravity field. At first, F1 pulls it upward (positive x) far ...


1

Just before the ball reaches the ground, all of its molecules are coming down with almost an equal speed that is the speed of the ball.(Although, due to the non-zero temperature of the ball, the molecules are also vibrating about their mean position wrt COM frame of the ball).And thus the ball possesses a systematic macroscopic kinetic energy. Now when ...


1

Your $E$ is potential energy in the rubber, which transforms to kinetic $K$. So your starting velocity $v$ will be: $E=1/2 mv^2$ From conservation of energy: $0-1/2 mv^2=0-mgh$ $h=v^2/2g$ and $v^2=2E/m$ Confirmed Interestingly enough the rubber does not obey Hook's law, and you need a lot more work if you want to find out what really ...


1

Suppose someone suggests that following a perfectly elastic collision, two billiard balls are each traveling twice as fast as they were before (and opposite to their original directions). You can't prove him wrong using conservation of momentum, but you can prove him wrong using conservation of energy. Therefore conservation of energy has implications that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible