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22

This is actually the paradox that led Einstein to the equivalence of mass and energy, and to General Relativity. Consider a special case: An electron and positron are at the Earth's surface. Bring them together and they annihilate, creating gamma rays (which is very energetic light). The gamma rays travel up to the Space Station, where they are converted ...


13

I believe, the answer is a small but quantifiable, yes, there is a non flat road configuration that would lead to better gas mileage between any two points at the same height. I have numerically solved for such an optimal path. I believe I can give a nice explanation of why that is, but it will take some work, so bear with me. Granted, you can only expect ...


9

...two roads of the same length. One road is flat, the other road goes up and down some hills. Will an automobile always get the best mileage driving between the two towns on the flat road versus the hilly one..? The question two roads (between two towns A, B) with a different profile cannot be of same length The flat road (1) is shorter, ...


8

Your guess at the solution to this paradox is correct. "Pumping energy up" to the space station, regardless of the method you choose, would require an input of at least the amount of energy you would gain in kinetic energy on the way down. This is just a variation on the impossible perpetual motion machine concept. In practice, you would not only not gain ...


7

Even if the laser had perfectly reflecting, i.e. lossless, mirrors at either end of the cavity, and both ends were sealed so no light could escape it would still require a continual power input. That's because excited atoms/molecules can decay by mechanisms that don't involve a photon e.g. collisional de-excitation. The lost energy goes into heating up the ...


4

First, it's not true that energies are generally in the form $\frac{a_1a_2^2}{2}$. Take the gravitational potential energy $U = \frac{GMm}{r}$ as an example. However, it is generally true that kinetic energy takes that quadratic form. Why? Kinetic energy is the energy traded when some agent applies a force on some system that causes it (the system) to ...


4

The problem does not mention any radii, but if we did know the radius of each sphere, would it be possible to skip conservation-of–linear momentum calculations altogether The accepted answer has confused you: You can simplify things by considering these conservation laws in the center of mass frame. There the total momentum is zero, therefore ...


3

Conservation of energy, as you note, holds for "the system." For instance, if you push on a ball, that ball gains energy, but the energy of the ball is not conserved--only the energy of you and the ball. In this case, the system needs to include more than just "the sloth" because the sloth is not an isolated system--there are external forces at work. Here, ...


2

A nice answer to this question may be found in the 2009 MIT Course on the Physics of Energy (Lecture 3) by R. Jaffe and W. Taylor. They work out the energy balance of car transport as an example of mechanical energy and its conservation. Let me briefly recap their findings in my own words. The two "towns" they consider are Boston and New York, both assumed ...


2

For example, given the initial peak height of the roller coaster, I can predict the velocity at any point, despite the fact that there are various loops and curves It is very simple: if you know the height $h$ of a body you know its potential energy which is $mgh$. This energy is given to the body (transformed into Kinetic energy) at every lower ...


1

From a very fundamental point of view one can see this with respect to Noether's theorem. Every symmetry is related to a conservation law, e.g. the symmetry of space with respect to rotational symmetry (space does not change if we rotate our coordinate system) results in conservation of angular momentum. In this framework energy is related to time symmetry. ...


1

You actually don't need to take any time derivatives here. Since the energy, $E$, is a constant, you only need to know it at one moment in time (say at t=0 as an initial condition), and you know it at all other times. Thus, just solve for $\dot{x}(t)$ in terms of the other quantities ($x,E,...)$ in the second equation that you have to get the equation of ...



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