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9

Yes, when you fire a pistol the hammer hits the bullet with a relatively small initial kinetic energy but the kinetic energy of the hammer and bullet after the collision is considerably higher. This may seem a silly example, but I think it actually highlights the important principle involved. In general when two bodies undergo an inelastic collision part of ...


6

Temperature means energy. The heat energy is still here. It's just that the "object" (the Universe) grown bigger so this energy had to spread through it. The more energy in a single point, the hotter it is. That's why they say it got cooler. It's like the expanding gas from your spray deodorant is cold when it leaves the can, but it was at room temperature ...


4

I will try to give a short introduction into the ideas of scientific truth as I understand them. In mathematics, the world is beautifully simple. We have axioms that the set to be true, and from these we can deduce a plethora of statements to be undoubtedly true - given that the axioms are true. There may be undecidable statements about which we cannot say ...


3

Let's assume that an experiment is performed that seems to indicate a violation of the conservation of energy principle. Now, I suppose that it's logically possible that the experiment actually and unambiguously falsifies the principle in which case we must conclude that the principle is approximate and we must seek a deeper principle to guide our ...


3

I will make my comments into an answer: If we are talking of the classical domain, energy is conserved but can change forms. Inelastic scattering has a strict definition and is usually used describing two body scattering processes. In two body impact situations conservation of input energy in the output products would require that the target has some ...


2

The cosmological constant is a constant energy density per unit volume of space, so as the universe expands this does indeed create energy as it creates new space. In this sense conservation of energy is violated. Actually this is less surprising than you might think. Conservation of energy is linked to a symmery called time shift symmetry by Noether's ...


2

Newton's third law. For the force the magnet exerts on the metal, there must be an equal an opposite force on the magnet exerted by the metal. Since both form one system (metal + truck + magnet), the net force on the system is zero, and it won't move.


2

When you measure the position of an electron that is in a pure energy state, what happens the energy becomes non-deterministic. An electron in a pure energy state is in a bound state. To "measure it" you have to excite it or , if it is in an already excited state measure the photon of its deexcitation. You cannot measure its position, while bound, to ...


2

When the universe expands, it is important to understand that how its energy content evolves depends on the form of energy involved. If all that energy is locked up in the form of mass energy, then the density of that matter will decrease proportionally to the relative increase of any arbitrary volume of the universe (i.e. if expansion doubles the size of ...


1

As Andres Salas said, your kinetic energy should be the negative of the potential energy at the surface. Also, you're using the wrong formula for the potential energy in the crater. $-GMm/r$ is correct only when $r\ge R$.


1

The answer is quite simple. You can't see it because you've forgotten that you make an unphysical simplification when considering "tied to an immovable wall" type situations. What's unphysical about the situation is quite simple : there's no such thing as an immovable wall. Let's say the rocket is tied to the earth. To say where the lost chemical potential ...


1

If you're looking for a general solution to the schrodinger equation then yes, it is possible for the atom to be in a superposition of energy states. This does not violate conservation of energy. Can you see why? It is a subtle point. To start you off -- how do you measure the position of the electron in the first place? You must hit it with something. This ...


1

The efficiency of large hydroelectric generators can be very high - up to 95% in ideal cases - however the efficiency of small installations is a lot lower and in particular it's hard to get efficient electricity generation if the flow rate is low, which is likely to be the case for your friend. But lets see what the potential is. You don't say what the ...


1

You may doubt that energy is conserved, but it is a direct consequence of Noether's theorem together with the assumption of time translation invariance, and this latter assumption is perhaps a bit more palatable/fundamental. That is, it is mathematically true that if the outcome of an experiment doesn't depend on when we perform it, the quantity we call ...


1

If your electron is in a pure state then it's an eigenfunction, $\psi_e$, of the Hamiltonian describing it, $H_e$. The measuring system will also, in principle at least, be described by some wavefunction, $\psi_m$. If the two don't interact then the total wavefunction will just be a product: $$ \Psi = \psi_e\psi_m $$ and the system won't change with time. ...


1

Actually, energy is often not Conserved in general Relativity. For are more in deep explanation see: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/GR/energy_gr.html But just notice that Dark Energy might not necessarily end up being the cosmological constant, but a new force field, so its behavior might differ from that of an actual cosmological ...


1

In general, the elasticity of a collision is dependent on the properties of the colliding objects. In a perfectly elastic collision, no kinetic energy is dissipated, which means the collision creates no heat, no sound, etc. In a perfectly inelastic collision, the maximum possible amount of kinetic energy is dissipated as heat, sound, etc. This corresponds ...



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