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The key properties of plasma that depend on the ion size are: 1) Electric conductivity since it depends on Coulomb scattering of electrons on ions and the rate of it scales as the ion charge squared 2) Radiation properties - for fully ionized plasmas the bremsstralung (braking) radiation due to the Coulomn scattering of electrons on ions strongly grows with ...


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Yes. Plasma consists of ionized matter. Which contains cathode rays (electrons) which are indipendant of the matter and positive rays ( nucleii) which depen on the matter ionized. So as plasma is a mixture of both it shows a significant physical difference. Eg: Density, Charge/Mass ratio, Effect due to Electro-magnetic fields


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Practically all the elements heavier than lead are created by neutron capture in the r-process. This requires the explosive conditions of a supernova or neutron star merger. In terms of some limit, I'm not sure how to answer. Stuff that's heavier than Uranium has a short half life compared to the age of the Earth, so there's not much to be found. They may ...


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Like is gold plasma more dense than iron's? If you mean mass density, then for the same ion number density and charge state (assuming quasi-neutrality) the gold plasma would have a higher mass density than that of iron. If you mean number density, then that would depend upon how the plasma was formed and under what conditions it currently exists (i.e., ...


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As John Rennie answered it very clearly, I would like to add some more details too. See, around early 1900 the idea of atoms was floating around the scientists' heads. At first everything was theory, but these things happened: You certainly heard of Joseph Thomson's cathode rays. Well, he actually calculated the ratio Q/m of atoms. (You can search any of ...


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There is no such experiment, though there are lots of experiments where the number of electrons in an atom are measured as a side effect. We know atoms are electrically neutral so there must be equal numbers of electrons and protons. We know successive elements in the periodic table are built up by incrementing the number of protons, so we know how many ...



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