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I noticed that no direct answers were provided to this question, so I decided to answer it from my own experience. In general, alloy additives can shift the density of an alloy either up or down. I don't know prescisely what the mechanics of the density shift are, but high-speed steels are a good example because of their tungsten content. An extreme example ...


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The answer is a qualified yes, depending on your definition of fusion. If you collect together a mass of iron less than about $1.2M_{\odot}$ it is possible for that to form a stable configuration, a little smaller than the size of the Earth, supported by electron degeneracy pressure. Such a star would just sit there and cool forever and all that would ...


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Iron won't fuse into heavier elements. It's a question of nuclear physics. Iron is the most stable form of nuclear matter. In other words, iron has the lowest energy configuration of all nuclear matter. Fusion can appear in the cores of stars because it's an exothermic process, that is, fusing nuclei lighter than iron can lower the nuclear matter's energy ...


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Let's say a field of stars all die within a short amount of time. Just for argument's sake they produce a debris field of iron ( or any other heavy element). Provided that there is enough time the debris will agglomerate, we know this. My question: Given enough mass, will this agglomeration of heavy elements fuse into even heavier elements? ...


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As I understand it regular fusion in a star takes light elements as input and the output is heavier elements and energy. There are several potential steps in the regular process, e.g: Hydrogen fusing to helium and producing energy which keeps the star from collapsing. After a lot of hydrygen is spent and helium has collected in the center of the star the ...


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As I understand it, iron will not be able to fuse with iron no matter how much of it you have gravitationally bound. Instead to fuse iron atoms together requires a supernova.


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Other materials that go in this category would be: Soft magnetic composite (SMC) Amorphous iron SMC is a composite of small(microscopic) ferromagnetic particles which are coated with some kind of plastic. It can be formed into almost any shape and it isn't laminated. The ferromagnetic properties aren't as good as with other materials, but it has a ...


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Not sure if this helps but I found some pads with the stickum on the back (peel and stick) would of bet my life they were rubber(even cut a piece out to make a new bottom of my sanding block which works great)....then I noticed a magnet stuck to it like steel (very flexible 1/16" thick pad can bend 180° and doesn't break until the bend is about 1/4th" apart) ...



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