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1

Depends what you mean by "produce". In a core collapse supernova, the r-process will produce a huge variety of heavy elements, some of them stable, some not stable. That is probably where most of the Uranium in the universe is made for instance. But even heavier elements with very short lifetimes are likely to be produced too. VY CMa is a fairly large (in ...


5

Let me answer your second question first. A free neutron has a larger mass than a free proton (on the order of 1 MeV). An electron's mass is about half an MeV so it is energetically possible (meaning total energy is conserved) for a neutron to decay into a proton and an electron and still have enough energy left over to form an anti-neutrino (moving almost ...


3

Yes! However, it very much depends on what you mean by atoms. For example - as ACuriousMind above mentioned, one of the more common ones is muonium. This is a muon bound to a proton (instead of an electron bound to a proton, as in hydrogen). You can solve this particular model quite easily using the same methods used for solving the hydrogen atom (i.e. ...


2

To choose among different possibilities, theoretical calculations are made to evaluate the likelihood of a successful fusion between the candidates. This is not a simple evaluation because it relies on nuclear models, and several branches may occur. The FIAS institute in Germany collaborates in this subject with Dubna in Russia, and they have made ...



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