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Elementary particles are classified into two groups: Bosons & Fermions. Fermions comes with two families: quarks and leptons. Leptons come with three generations (till date no fourth generation leptons observed). Same is true for quarks as well.The first generation consists of electron $e^{-}$ and electron-neutrino $\tau_{e}$. Standard way of ...


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I would answer this question differently. From other perspective, a electron gets its charge by the only generator that is not broken after the S.S.B of the SU(2)xU(1) gauge group. In this case $$ Q = \frac{1}{2} Y + T_{3} $$ Where $ Y $ is the hypercharge eingevalue and $ T_{3} $ is the eigenvalue related to the SU(2) diagonal generator. So, as every ...


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An electron is a fundamental particle(Lepton) and is different from both protons and neutrons, which are not fundamental(i.e they are made from even more smaller particles called quarks). For an electron, the charge it has is an intrinsic property, that is it is a part of its description along with mass and spin. Coming to neutrons and protons, even though ...


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1 How does an electron get its charge? This is the elementary particle table . The electron is an elementary particle and its charge is an observable attribute that , together with its other quantum numbers and mass, classify it as an electron. And how can it maintain that charge for very long (infinite) periods of time? Observations ...


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Scattering experiments can be used to determine the size of a particle. The results for an extended object are different than that of a point particle. But all of these scattering experiments depend on getting the probe particle "close" to the scattering object. In the case of electrons, that means launching the probe with enough energy to overcome the ...



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