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According to Grand Unification Theory, protons can decay into electron (even at low energy; just the probability is very low). It doesn't mean you can replace proton with electron.


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It depends who you ask. A string theorist would answer that string theory is the idea that the point-like particles of elementary particle physics can also be modeled as one-dimensional objects called strings. According to string theory, strings can oscillate in many ways. On distance scales larger than the string radius, each oscillation mode gives rise to ...


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No. The atoms are protons, electrons and neutrons. The fact that neutrons beta decay into a proton + electron + electron antineutrino does not mean that neutrons are made of a proton and electron and a neutrino.


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No. The decay products of a certain particle are not equivalent to its constituents. This is evident especially in the context of fundamental particles: quarks can decay into other particles, but that does not mean that a quark is not elementary (see my answer to this question). Nuclei are made of neutrons and protons, which in turn consist of quarks and ...


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Not really, at least not if you want to stay with properties you would normally associate to particles. That is because particles are not the fundamental objects of quantum field theories, but fields.1 There's more to the theory than charges and masses. For every symmetry group of the theory, a field must transform in a representation of it. Now, you can ...


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In realistic QFT, fields or their interaction law mostly correspond to irreducible representations of some symmetry groups. If we assume free theory, there is only one important symmetry: it's Poincare symmetry (it is the most important symmetry - in flat spacetime each field theory must satisfy it). Poincare symmetry leads to the statement that free ...


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Once upon a time physicists dreamed that there would be one Theory of Everything (TOE) that would explain everything we see around us, or at least, from which all of the supposedly fundamental constants could be calculated and which would be so logically consistent it might explain why this is the only way things could be. That dream has died over the past ...


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...space, time, energy, matter or even motion. I'm not quite sure how these things relate to each other, such as whether or not one emerges from another, or if there are even more fundamental 'elements' that make up our universe. I'm also unsure if physicists agree everything can be reduced down to one of them, such as energy. What are all of ...


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The link Kyle gives in his comment expands enough on the reasons a) why is there still matter in existence?. That there exists matter as we know it is an experimental observation that has to be taken into account in any theoretical formulation. The existence of matter and antimatter is an experimental observation in the elementary particles data in our ...



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