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If one understand "carry particle" in the meaning that the particles move with the same velocity as the photons, than clearly no: Photons by itself could not carry particles. Photons move with the velocity of light $c$ and massive particles could not be accelerated to this velocity. This is both an observation and the basis of the Special and General ...


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Good question :-) In the "ancient" times there was this old problem about the particle-wave duality. At the time, there was a Pilot wave theory, on which the particles and the waves are also different entities in some interaction. But it didn't live too long. Probably it failed some sophisticated experiments. On the current theory, there are fields, and ...


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This is an interesting reference, but it seems to me that the measurements are controversial enough that they are certainly not, at this point, at the stage where they force any re-think of nuclear and solar physics as currently understood. The paper in question is Power spectrum analyses of nuclear decay rates. D. Javorsek II et al., Astropart. Phys. ...


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Some scientists do believe there are more fundamental particles (or strings, in the case of string theory). Others believe it isn't so much that there are more fundamental particles, it's that there are fundamental particles not yet discovered (as an obviously theoretical example, the graviton). As for the reason, the current theory of physics (the ...


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A somewhat meaningful and useful concept for massive particles is the Compton wavelength: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compton_wavelength#Limitation_on_measurement The Compton wavelength of a particle is determined by its rest mass. The position of a particle cannot be measured with a precision less than half its reduced Compton wavelength. In this sense, ...


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A point particle is an idealization of a particle. It simplifies calculations by using a 0 dimensional object instead of a normal particle in calculations where size, shape, and structure are irrelevant. For example, in the theory of, say, electromagnetism, scientists will talk about a point charge - a particle represented by a point that has a non-zero ...



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