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Be careful to compare the same quantity. You ask if gravity (a force) affects the voltage (a potential energy). These are related but not identical. For a first round comparison, check out the forces due to gravity and a standard voltage (1 Volt over a distance of 1 cm): First, the gravitational force on an electron at the surface of the Earth: $$F_g = mg = ...


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You are being imprecise about electricity. It's probably better to just think of electricity as current. You have a current whenever you have a charge moving. To your question, yes, positrons are just as good as electrons for carrying a charge. There is no difference between "positron electricity" and "electron electricity". Another way to see this is ...


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The electron on an atom gets excited to a higher level when some how the energy is transferred to the electron. But I can't understand it. The way we currently understand in physics this interaction is exactly like that: a photon transfers its energy to the atom and as a consequence one of the electrons goes to a corresponding exited state. And this can ...


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The electron does not move - it has no well-defined position in the orbital state, and hence no well-defined momentum. Neither does it "teleport" around - as long as it is not interacting with something that forces it to be at a definite position, its state is "smeared" all over the electron as an electron cloud. Yes, this is essentially the Bohr model, ...


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When a charged particle comes into the vicinity of another, it's path is deflected. It decelerates in one direction, and accelerates in another. All charged particles that are accelerated/decelerated by another charged particle, or a magnetic field, emit radiation. See: Bremsstrahlung. Synchrotron radiation. Cyclotron radiation.


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The change in velocity of the electron give rise to emission of X-rays. The electrons arrive at the anode with very high velocity and end up at thermal velocities - which must mean they slowed down. Both statements are therefore true.


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You are right, it happen due to circular motion. This effect is called Thomas precession. In 1925 Thomas relativistically recomputed the precessional frequency of the doublet separation in the fine structure of the atom. He thus found the missing factor 1/2, which came to be known as the Thomas half. There are several method to derive it. For example one ...


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The rationale is this: Assuming that $x$ and $x'$ are random vriables Their variances are given as $\left<\Delta x^2 \right>$ and $\left< \Delta x'^2 \right>$ Now the covariance of both $x$ and $x'$ is different if $x$ and $x'$ are correlated as random variables or not. If they are not correlated the covariance (joint correlation) is just the ...


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The probability of atomic excitation by photon absorption is given in terms of the "cross- section" for single photon absorption. This quantity shows a sharp peak if the photon energy and the atomic energy level difference match (the coupling between the atom and electromagnetic field causes the atomic states to broaden, the natural line width). Thus ...


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If you think about the infinite square well problem, the states with higher energy have higher momentum, (and also a higher velocity). However, it is better to think of the higher energy states as higher frequency standing waves. Because they have a higher frequency, the have to "travel faster", which is where the large velocity comes from in the Fermi ...


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In a Fermi-Dirac distribution, the relationship between temperature and the speed of particles is not intuitive. Even at cold temperatures, fermions can have high speeds simply because of degeneracy - the lower momentum states "fill up", leaving only states with large momentum available, and this is true even at very cold temperatures. However, the heat ...


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To start with the electric field of the electron is as far as possible to measure symmetric, the electric dipole moment is very small. In this article The electron's EDM must be collinear with the direction of the electron's magnetic moment (spin). Within the standard model of elementary particle physics, such a dipole is predicted to be non-zero but ...



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