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5

Nowadays, the answer is negligibly so. Video cameras now digitise the image as pixels in parallel using charge coupled device technology. Former technologies, however, would emit appreciable bremstrahlung from decelerating electron beams, as I now describe. Before the coming of CCD arrays, the main video technology was the scanned photocathode, also called ...


5

This is a part answer - my (published) research has been in detecting UVA and UVB using smartphone cameras, but there has been research and a successful app made to detect gamma radiation using a smartphone camera by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, as reported on their webpage Smartphone radiation detector app tests positive. ...


4

If we believe this measurement shown by Omen, smartphone cameras are basically useless below Dose rates of 10uSv/h. The max. exposure limit for a human who is not a radiation worker is 1mSv/year, which translates into roughly 0.11uSv/h. In other words, the camera chip in a phone would have to be 100 times more sensitive to pick up relevant amounts of ...


4

Your eye has a lens in it. Without a lens, the light is all spread out and overlapping, just like you say. The light from any given pixel goes out in all directions, but a lens can make it re-converge back to a point. Hold up a sheet of white paper. Is there an image on it? No, of course not. It has light on it---light coming from each object in the ...


3

A capacitor is often used for "decoupling". The wires into any electrical appliance have inductance (because they are long and thin). This means that if there is a sudden increased demand in current, there will be a significant voltage drop. A capacitor can act as a "tiny battery" that briefly supplies this current while the main supply catches up. A fan ...


2

As the producer of one of these apps (GammaPix, available for Android and iOS, if you'll forgive the plug), allow me to weigh in here. Yes, smartphone, and other CMOS and CCD cameras, can detect radiation. While cameras are less sensitive then Geiger-Muller counters, specialized solid state detectors, and scintillators, they are sensitive enough for quite a ...


1

A couple of suggestions: (1) the EE stackexchange site a better home for this question (2) simply solve for the voltage across the capacitor and the current through the inductor. Once you have those, the energies stored, as a function of time are just $$W_L(t) = \frac{L}{2}i^2_L$$ and $$W_C(t) = \frac{C}{2}v^2_C$$ Since this is evidently a DC circuit ...


1

Many fan motors are single phase, permanent split capacitor (PSC) induction motors. Single phase motors inherently have no starting torque and to get around this problem, engineers often "trick" the motor into thinking it is being supplied by 2 phases instead of one. This is done by adding a second set of windings to the motor that are physically offset to ...


1

If motor A does the same job as motor B, but with a 10x greater load, and the mechanical advantage (gearing etc) is the same, then I would expect that the torque that A supplies is ten times greater as well. But that is not quite how you phrased the question. It necessarily follows that a higher HP motor can supply greater torque - at least, with the right ...


1

The inherent idea is, from that equation $$I = \exp (\frac{eU}{k_B T})$$ if you plot $(\ln I)$ versus $U$, that would be a straight line (of the form $y=mx$), with a slope $$\alpha = \frac{e}{k_B T}$$ That's all you have to do in the experiment, use least square fitting to find an accurate value of $\alpha$ and then find the Boltzmann constant using the ...


1

Typically it is the ferrite cores in inductors/transformers that resonate mechanically, or through magnetostrictive effects that produce a high pitched whine. Switching PSUs are the main culprit. It can also occur when the EM fields interact with steel components in the PSU.



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