Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Two points 1) mostly it will take a long time for all the ions to neutralize 2) it is not always the ions that neutralize.... for example, if you have sodium hydroxide , Na$^+$OH$^-$ then the reactions at the electrodes are $$2H^+ + 2e^- \rightarrow H_2$$ and $$4OH^- \rightarrow 2H_2O + O_2 +4e^-$$ and the $H^+$ and $OH^-$ ions used up are replenished by ...


1

This is not an answer, I just place here a picture for a comment on the covalent bond.


4

Since the anti-proton and electrons are different particles there is no Pauli principle requiring them to stay apart. In effect we get a set of electronic orbitals and a set of anti-protonic orbitals. These will all be approximately hydrogenic, though their exact form will be perturbed away from the hydrogenic orbitals by the repulsion between negative ...


0

The relationship between energy, angular momentum, and shape of the orbital are all strongly dependent on the mass of the particle. This will be VERY different for antiprotons than for electrons. For example, for conventional atoms You can see the term $a_\mu$ appear in the denominator several times: that's the mass of the electron. Depending on the ...


0

Before asking if two halogen atoms could share an anti-proton, ask if they can share an electron. As far as I remember the chemical bonds between two atoms are so as to form in both atoms a complete shell. For instance, in the molecule of salt, NaCl, the Na atom has a superfluous electron (see the electron shells of Na in the periodic table of elements, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included